Urdu is a daughter of Sanskrit not the language of Pakistan

jee_nee_us

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
urdu is called lashkari zuban and it developed as different lashkars invaded subcontinent. Maan behan bana ker urdu ki maan behan na ker.
 

akinternational

Minister (2k+ posts)
iss JAHUL ko agar URDU ke ma'ane maloom hote to aisa ehmaqana bayan na dete..
URDU asl me ORDU hai jo turkish lafz hai ma'na hain LASHKAR. yaani jaise lashkar men mukhtalif zabazon ke log hote hain aur mili juli zaban bolte hain wese hi urdu bhi hai... jis men arabi, farsi aur turki ke alawa kai aur zabano ke alfaz shamil hain aur mazeed ho rahe hain
 

AbbuJee

Senator (1k+ posts)
Urdu comes from a Turkish word ‘ordu’, which means ‘camp’. Thats why it was known as Laskhkari zabaan. Iss dhakkan ko koe bata day kay Hinidi pe Sanskrit ka asar .. aur Urdu pe Farsi aur Arabic ka asar hai.

Pata nahe kahan say khud he chaval uth kay aa jatay hain
 

xshadow

Minister (2k+ posts)
میں پوری طرح اتفاق نہیں کرتا کہ اردو کی ماں سنسکرت ہے۔
اردو کا لفظی مطلب ہے لشکر۔
یہ مغلیہ دور میں وجود میں آئی جب فوج میں مختلف زبانوں کے بولنے والے ہوا کرتے تھے۔
اردو کے کئی الفاظ سنسکرت سے بھی لیے گئے ہیں مگر اسکے زیادہ تر الفاظ عربی اور فارسی سے لیے گئے ہیں۔ اب تو اس میں کچھ انگلشن کے الفاظ بھی شامل ہوچکے ہیں۔
اس لیے کسی ایک زبان کو اردو کی ماں کہہ دینا غلط ہے۔
 

Citizen X

Prime Minister (20k+ posts)
Urdu is nothing but a ghach much of many languages which was forcefully imposed on us by our English rulers to get rid of Farsi as it was the royal language of Muslim kings and rulers of this region.

Even today Urdu is only native to a very tiny % of the Pakistani population and a 1 hour drive in any direction outside of any city and you will be hard pressed to find anyone who speaks it.

Personally I think we should get rid of it. Specially in the education sector.
 

Eigoroll

Councller (250+ posts)
Urdu is nothing but a ghach much of many languages which was forcefully imposed on us by our English rulers to get rid of Farsi as it was the royal language of Muslim kings and rulers of this region.

Even today Urdu is only native to a very tiny % of the Pakistani population and a 1 hour drive in any direction outside of any city and you will be hard pressed to find anyone who speaks it.

Personally I think we should get rid of it. Specially in the education sector.
Farsi was already on its way out by the time the British arrived in India. There is a reason that the last Mughal emperor, his courtiers, and the poets of that time, including Ghalib, had their work in Urdu and not in Farsi.

Urdu is a Lingua Franca which doesn't have to be the Native tongue of the majority of the people. But it has been changing as more and more people in Pakistan are born in Urdu speaking environment regardless of their ethnicity.
 

Citizen X

Prime Minister (20k+ posts)
Farsi was already on its way out by the time the British arrived in India. There is a reason that the last Mughal emperor, his courtiers, and the poets of that time, including Ghalib, had their work in Urdu and not in Farsi.

Urdu is a Lingua Franca which doesn't have to be the Native tongue of the majority of the people. But it has been changing as more and more people in Pakistan are born in Urdu speaking environment regardless of their ethnicity.
I only see it as a hindrance in our development as none of the technical education can be given in Urdu and very late in life students have to start learning a new Language just be able to complete their further studies. I've seen many a Doctor, Engineer etc etc with abhorrent English language skills, one can only imagine how good a Doctor or Engineer that person must be when the technical education he received in his chosen field is in a language he can barely read, write or speak.

I have no issues with it if people use it as a tool for mass communication among themselves. Also need to get rid of this stigma of Parents ditching their own languages for Urdu for their children because in our society speaking good Urdu is seen as a sign of of superiority.

I too am a victim of this mentality, even though I grew up outside of Pakistan. I was taught Urdu and not Punjabi, my native language. I learnt it myself in my late teens and early 20s after seeing what a beautiful language it was.

And now my regret is I wasn't able to teach it to my kids as my better half does not hail from Pakistan and English is the common language at home. 😔
 

Qutubddin Aibak Qazilbash

Politcal Worker (100+ posts)
Urdu is indeed a daughter of Sanskrit. I was travelling in Nepal and went to Luchnow and Aligarh. I was stunned by how the local Hindus were so close to the Urdu spoken in Karachi. Urdu my have picked up odd words from Persian and Arabic but it is mostly a Sanksrit. More than words it was the accent and pronunciation which was identical. These people have never been exposed to Persian, Turkish influence.

People are once again in denial. Just like they are obsessed with being descendants of Arabs and Sahaba , likewise they cannot accept the reality that the DNA of Urdu is indeed Sankskrit.
 

Eigoroll

Councller (250+ posts)
I only see it as a hindrance in our development as none of the technical education can be given in Urdu and very late in life students have to start learning a new Language just be able to complete their further studies. I've seen many a Doctor, Engineer etc etc with abhorrent English language skills, one can only imagine how good a Doctor or Engineer that person must be when the technical education he received in his chosen field is in a language he can barely read, write or speak.
You are correct in a sense. But imagine how many bright minds we failed to nurture as we insisted on having higher education in a foreign language which many don't grasp. By having the opportunity to be in the universities of some leading non- English speaking nations, I can share that none of them have their main courses in English. The only thing English-related are the technical terms to enable students to synchronize their understanding of their respective fields globally. We could have done the same thing in Urdu, but as usual, Pakistanis prefer to ape as long as they can.
I have no issues with it if people use it as a tool for mass communication among themselves. Also need to get rid of this stigma of Parents ditching their own languages for Urdu for their children because in our society speaking good Urdu is seen as a sign of of superiority.

I too am a victim of this mentality, even though I grew up outside of Pakistan. I was taught Urdu and not Punjabi, my native language. I learnt it myself in my late teens and early 20s after seeing what a beautiful language it was.

And now my regret is I wasn't able to teach it to my kids as my better half does not hail from Pakistan and English is the common language at home.
You hit the nail with this one. I share your experiences and the reasons behind them. It is frustrating to see how, after the creation of Pakistan, the Punjabis self-programmed themselves to hate their language and culture. I envy Sikhs who, even after many generations abroad, are proud of their language.
 

alisajid

Senator (1k+ posts)
Urdu is a combination of Persian, Arabic, Sanskrit and Turkish......but it's Grammer is derived from Sanskrit and Hindi......

Urdu incorporates any word of any language which is widely spoken in that region. That's why you will find Urdu spoken in Luknow, Dehli, Lahore and Karachi have different spoken styles....
 

alisajid

Senator (1k+ posts)
Half of the poeple don't even know that Urdu was first developed and spoken in Golkanda, an old name for Hydrabad.....
 
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