This baloongra also backstabbed Imran Khan.

carne

Minister (2k+ posts)
665943b0aa2df.jpg

Zafar Mirza - Special Assistant to the PM (Imran Khan) for National Health Services, Regulation & Coordination

EVERY issue in Pakistan is linked to political instability and bad governance. These are two sides of the same coin, and they feed off one another. We have come to the point where people are losing hope, especially young men and women and those with small children. Who can blame them when political instability and uncertainty continue to grow, with no light at the end of the tunnel?

The quagmire is evident in our debt-driven economy and shameful human development indicators. Our neonatal mortality rate is second only to that of Lesotho, a sub-Saharan African country. If considered by region, the neonatal mortality rate in Balochistan alone would be the highest in the world. Two indicators put together speak volumes about the mess we have created in Pakistan by ignoring the people: 26 million of our children are out of school, which is the highest number in the world and around 40 per cent of children suffer from stunted mental and physical growth — that is, uneducated, stunted children. But these children are not yours or mine. They are out there somewhere. Sometimes we catch a glimpse of the tip of these icebergs from the windows of our air-conditioned cars, but we never realise the depths of the submerged mountains.

People are cracking under inflation. Bereft farmers and losing ‘winners’ with complaints of stolen mandates are running from pillar to post for respite against the scandalous wheat crisis and manipulated elections, respectively. These two contemporary crises amply reflect our overall state of affairs. A three-legged termite of helplessness, hopelessness and haplessness is busy eating us within.

The biggest problem of all is that there is ‘no problem’! With our heads in the sand, we constantly click ‘Inshallah’ and ‘Mashallah’ on our digital counters wrapped around our index fingers. A small orchestra is playing and a game of musical chairs is underway on the deck of, God forbid, the Titanic.

Human resilience is raising its head; a breath of fresh air seems to be finding its way in.

In a recent article, Miftah Ismail, twice finance minister of Pakistan, wrote, “we are fast reaching the point of no return…”. While elaborating on the rationale for why Pakistan needs a new political party, he lamented, “unfortunately, our existing political leaders are outdated, out of touch, and devoid of any vision for the nation’s future. I am sorry to say they lack both the courage and the competence to change the course of this country.” Difficult to disagree with this heavily evidence-based assertion, isn’t it?

Indeed, over the last five years, during which all the main political parties have been in power, the polycrisis has only proliferated. The last spike of ‘change’ has changed us in a strange way; only a battered and mindless popularity remains — nobody knows for how long and nobody knows what to do with it. Meanwhile, sight is blurry, breathing laboured and hope morbid.

In the midst of these, human resilience is raising its head and a breath of fresh air seems to be finding its way in.

Former prime minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi started distancing himself from the PML-N as he disagreed with the party’s familial power-at-all-costs politics. He asserted that our problems have grown much too complicated, and no single existing party could resolve them without all stakeholders sitting down and planning seriously for the long term. But the ‘stakeholders’ are too busy sabotaging each other. Miftah Ismail was unfairly elbowed out and replaced by a returning finance minister, but he didn’t remain silent and started calling a spade a spade. Mustafa Nawaz Khokhar was asked to resign as the chair of the Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights for his ‘political positions’ and raising his voice against the custodial torture of political opponents. He smilingly said goodbye to the Senate and the party. How many such examples do we know of in our archaic game-of-thrones politics?

The three then joined hands and started ‘reimagining Pakistan’. A series of seminars were held across the country. I travelled to attend a few myself. One ran for seven hours non-stop, and another for nine, in severely cold weather. The halls were jam-packed. It is heartening to note that young people were the most active participants. They expressed their frustrations, hopes, efforts and suggestions. I came back from these seminars with a rekindling of hope.

Now a party is in the making. Not just a party, the foundations of a political institution are being laid, something none of us have ever experienced in the country.

Although we have beaten meanings out of words, don’t we want to see a party that is truly democratic, transparent in its decisions — including those involving its financing base — in which hereditary politics has no place, where all party offices are time-bound, and where a young party member at the lowest rung has equal opportunity to rise in the ranks? A party that provides Pakistanis with the opportunity to experience functional democratic politics, something none of us have ever experienced in our national lives? A party squarely focused on economic and human development in one go, not as a trickle-down that never trickles, and with a sharp focus on youth and women’s development? A party that restores Pakistanis’ confidence in their country and in responsible democratic politics? A party that not only reflects the aspirations of young people but also works hard to create equal economic opportunities for them by identifying, developing and realising Pakistan’s multiple comparative advantages in trade, in services, and import substitution manufacturing? A party that believes in restoring peace within and with neighbours?

And very importantly, a party that actually believes in the Constitution and does not hesitate to commit and uphold the principle of the establishment’s non-interference in politics?

All this sound too good to be true, and yet there is a ‘need for a new political party’. A new politics seems to be emerging at last!
 
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Nice2MU

President (40k+ posts)
پارٹی بنانا تو کپڑے پہنے سے بھی زیادہ آسان کام ہے لیکن اسے چلانا اتنا مشکل ہے کہ 7 لاکھ غنڈوں کی فوج پورا ٹل کا زور لگا کے پرویز خٹک اور ترین کو سیٹیں نہ جتوا سکے۔
 

ahameed

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Real problem is not Sharif of Zardari. It's GHQ which is all that ails us.
اس سے انشااللہ نیازی جان چھڑانے کے بعد ہی جائے گا اوپر

اگلے دو الیکشن بھی اسی طرح اسٹیبلشمنٹ ہار گئی تو کبھی بھی دوبارہ پسند کی حکومت بنانے کی پوزیشن میں نہیں رہے گی
 

exitonce

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
پارٹی بنانا تو کپڑے پہنے سے بھی زیادہ آسان کام ہے لیکن اسے چلانا اتنا مشکل ہے کہ 7 لاکھ غنڈوں کی فوج پورا ٹل کا زور لگا کے پرویز خٹک اور ترین کو سیٹیں نہ جتوا سکے۔
LUNMBER ONE HAY NA PARTY CHALLANAY KO.
 

Saladin A

Minister (2k+ posts)
665943b0aa2df.jpg

Zafar Mirza - Special Assistant to the PM (Imran Khan) for National Health Services, Regulation & Coordination

EVERY issue in Pakistan is linked to political instability and bad governance. These are two sides of the same coin, and they feed off one another. We have come to the point where people are losing hope, especially young men and women and those with small children. Who can blame them when political instability and uncertainty continue to grow, with no light at the end of the tunnel?

The quagmire is evident in our debt-driven economy and shameful human development indicators. Our neonatal mortality rate is second only to that of Lesotho, a sub-Saharan African country. If considered by region, the neonatal mortality rate in Balochistan alone would be the highest in the world. Two indicators put together speak volumes about the mess we have created in Pakistan by ignoring the people: 26 million of our children are out of school, which is the highest number in the world and around 40 per cent of children suffer from stunted mental and physical growth — that is, uneducated, stunted children. But these children are not yours or mine. They are out there somewhere. Sometimes we catch a glimpse of the tip of these icebergs from the windows of our air-conditioned cars, but we never realise the depths of the submerged mountains.

People are cracking under inflation. Bereft farmers and losing ‘winners’ with complaints of stolen mandates are running from pillar to post for respite against the scandalous wheat crisis and manipulated elections, respectively. These two contemporary crises amply reflect our overall state of affairs. A three-legged termite of helplessness, hopelessness and haplessness is busy eating us within.

The biggest problem of all is that there is ‘no problem’! With our heads in the sand, we constantly click ‘Inshallah’ and ‘Mashallah’ on our digital counters wrapped around our index fingers. A small orchestra is playing and a game of musical chairs is underway on the deck of, God forbid, the Titanic.

Human resilience is raising its head; a breath of fresh air seems to be finding its way in.

In a recent article, Miftah Ismail, twice finance minister of Pakistan, wrote, “we are fast reaching the point of no return…”. While elaborating on the rationale for why Pakistan needs a new political party, he lamented, “unfortunately, our existing political leaders are outdated, out of touch, and devoid of any vision for the nation’s future. I am sorry to say they lack both the courage and the competence to change the course of this country.” Difficult to disagree with this heavily evidence-based assertion, isn’t it?

Indeed, over the last five years, during which all the main political parties have been in power, the polycrisis has only proliferated. The last spike of ‘change’ has changed us in a strange way; only a battered and mindless popularity remains — nobody knows for how long and nobody knows what to do with it. Meanwhile, sight is blurry, breathing laboured and hope morbid.

In the midst of these, human resilience is raising its head and a breath of fresh air seems to be finding its way in.

Former prime minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi started distancing himself from the PML-N as he disagreed with the party’s familial power-at-all-costs politics. He asserted that our problems have grown much too complicated, and no single existing party could resolve them without all stakeholders sitting down and planning seriously for the long term. But the ‘stakeholders’ are too busy sabotaging each other. Miftah Ismail was unfairly elbowed out and replaced by a returning finance minister, but he didn’t remain silent and started calling a spade a spade. Mustafa Nawaz Khokhar was asked to resign as the chair of the Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights for his ‘political positions’ and raising his voice against the custodial torture of political opponents. He smilingly said goodbye to the Senate and the party. How many such examples do we know of in our archaic game-of-thrones politics?

The three then joined hands and started ‘reimagining Pakistan’. A series of seminars were held across the country. I travelled to attend a few myself. One ran for seven hours non-stop, and another for nine, in severely cold weather. The halls were jam-packed. It is heartening to note that young people were the most active participants. They expressed their frustrations, hopes, efforts and suggestions. I came back from these seminars with a rekindling of hope.

Now a party is in the making. Not just a party, the foundations of a political institution are being laid, something none of us have ever experienced in the country.

Although we have beaten meanings out of words, don’t we want to see a party that is truly democratic, transparent in its decisions — including those involving its financing base — in which hereditary politics has no place, where all party offices are time-bound, and where a young party member at the lowest rung has equal opportunity to rise in the ranks? A party that provides Pakistanis with the opportunity to experience functional democratic politics, something none of us have ever experienced in our national lives? A party squarely focused on economic and human development in one go, not as a trickle-down that never trickles, and with a sharp focus on youth and women’s development? A party that restores Pakistanis’ confidence in their country and in responsible democratic politics? A party that not only reflects the aspirations of young people but also works hard to create equal economic opportunities for them by identifying, developing and realising Pakistan’s multiple comparative advantages in trade, in services, and import substitution manufacturing? A party that believes in restoring peace within and with neighbours?

And very importantly, a party that actually believes in the Constitution and does not hesitate to commit and uphold the principle of the establishment’s non-interference in politics?

All this sound too good to be true, and yet there is a ‘need for a new political party’. A new politics seems to be emerging at last!
And, the party's leaders will be wearing big military boots and fake medals with cognitive impairment, low education and low IQ and sitting in the GHQ rule Pakistan by proxy. PM Imran Khan is the only leader who is a brilliant academic, brilliant intellectual, highly educated, pragmatic, highly educated, sagacious, philosophical, capable and visionary leader who is loved, adored, admired and trusted by hundreds of millions of patriotic Pakistanis will bring change for the better for the country and its masses.

The masses of Pakistan will ever trust no other new political party and its leader. So the idea of a new political party coming into existence is as absurd as living in Walter Mitty's dream world. All that the country needs at this moment in our history is the unconditional release of PM Imran Khan from illegal imprisonment for over ten months by the corrupt military junta ruling the country by proxy and the removal of this Form 47 'mandate choor' PDM government of ruthless mafia dons, embezzlers, money launderers, looters of trillions of rupees from state coffers and notorious international fraudsters installed at gunpoint by the corrupt, power-hungry and manipulative generals and hand over the political power to the legitimate Form 45 winners of 8 February 2024 general election and forget of creating any 'boolangri nakami' party.
 

digitalzygot1

Minister (2k+ posts)
665943b0aa2df.jpg

Zafar Mirza - Special Assistant to the PM (Imran Khan) for National Health Services, Regulation & Coordination

EVERY issue in Pakistan is linked to political instability and bad governance. These are two sides of the same coin, and they feed off one another. We have come to the point where people are losing hope, especially young men and women and those with small children. Who can blame them when political instability and uncertainty continue to grow, with no light at the end of the tunnel?

The quagmire is evident in our debt-driven economy and shameful human development indicators. Our neonatal mortality rate is second only to that of Lesotho, a sub-Saharan African country. If considered by region, the neonatal mortality rate in Balochistan alone would be the highest in the world. Two indicators put together speak volumes about the mess we have created in Pakistan by ignoring the people: 26 million of our children are out of school, which is the highest number in the world and around 40 per cent of children suffer from stunted mental and physical growth — that is, uneducated, stunted children. But these children are not yours or mine. They are out there somewhere. Sometimes we catch a glimpse of the tip of these icebergs from the windows of our air-conditioned cars, but we never realise the depths of the submerged mountains.

People are cracking under inflation. Bereft farmers and losing ‘winners’ with complaints of stolen mandates are running from pillar to post for respite against the scandalous wheat crisis and manipulated elections, respectively. These two contemporary crises amply reflect our overall state of affairs. A three-legged termite of helplessness, hopelessness and haplessness is busy eating us within.

The biggest problem of all is that there is ‘no problem’! With our heads in the sand, we constantly click ‘Inshallah’ and ‘Mashallah’ on our digital counters wrapped around our index fingers. A small orchestra is playing and a game of musical chairs is underway on the deck of, God forbid, the Titanic.

Human resilience is raising its head; a breath of fresh air seems to be finding its way in.

In a recent article, Miftah Ismail, twice finance minister of Pakistan, wrote, “we are fast reaching the point of no return…”. While elaborating on the rationale for why Pakistan needs a new political party, he lamented, “unfortunately, our existing political leaders are outdated, out of touch, and devoid of any vision for the nation’s future. I am sorry to say they lack both the courage and the competence to change the course of this country.” Difficult to disagree with this heavily evidence-based assertion, isn’t it?

Indeed, over the last five years, during which all the main political parties have been in power, the polycrisis has only proliferated. The last spike of ‘change’ has changed us in a strange way; only a battered and mindless popularity remains — nobody knows for how long and nobody knows what to do with it. Meanwhile, sight is blurry, breathing laboured and hope morbid.

In the midst of these, human resilience is raising its head and a breath of fresh air seems to be finding its way in.

Former prime minister Shahid Khaqan Abbasi started distancing himself from the PML-N as he disagreed with the party’s familial power-at-all-costs politics. He asserted that our problems have grown much too complicated, and no single existing party could resolve them without all stakeholders sitting down and planning seriously for the long term. But the ‘stakeholders’ are too busy sabotaging each other. Miftah Ismail was unfairly elbowed out and replaced by a returning finance minister, but he didn’t remain silent and started calling a spade a spade. Mustafa Nawaz Khokhar was asked to resign as the chair of the Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights for his ‘political positions’ and raising his voice against the custodial torture of political opponents. He smilingly said goodbye to the Senate and the party. How many such examples do we know of in our archaic game-of-thrones politics?

The three then joined hands and started ‘reimagining Pakistan’. A series of seminars were held across the country. I travelled to attend a few myself. One ran for seven hours non-stop, and another for nine, in severely cold weather. The halls were jam-packed. It is heartening to note that young people were the most active participants. They expressed their frustrations, hopes, efforts and suggestions. I came back from these seminars with a rekindling of hope.

Now a party is in the making. Not just a party, the foundations of a political institution are being laid, something none of us have ever experienced in the country.

Although we have beaten meanings out of words, don’t we want to see a party that is truly democratic, transparent in its decisions — including those involving its financing base — in which hereditary politics has no place, where all party offices are time-bound, and where a young party member at the lowest rung has equal opportunity to rise in the ranks? A party that provides Pakistanis with the opportunity to experience functional democratic politics, something none of us have ever experienced in our national lives? A party squarely focused on economic and human development in one go, not as a trickle-down that never trickles, and with a sharp focus on youth and women’s development? A party that restores Pakistanis’ confidence in their country and in responsible democratic politics? A party that not only reflects the aspirations of young people but also works hard to create equal economic opportunities for them by identifying, developing and realising Pakistan’s multiple comparative advantages in trade, in services, and import substitution manufacturing? A party that believes in restoring peace within and with neighbours?

And very importantly, a party that actually believes in the Constitution and does not hesitate to commit and uphold the principle of the establishment’s non-interference in politics?

All this sound too good to be true, and yet there is a ‘need for a new political party’. A new politics seems to be emerging at last!
Well said. This is what they want, they/ establishment will soon sell nuclear weapons 100% and tell people see due to corrupt politicians we don't have a choice and in order to get rid of debt we have jo choice. Script has been written decades back. They will recognise Israel and meet western demands of giving up nuclear weapons. What these morons don't realise is they will suffer worst fate than Ukraine. Generals will run away like in Iraq. What is happening in Pakistan is well planned and systematic dismantling, ruinning of all institutions. They want brain drain so they can rule without challange. More foreign remittances for them.

Sad thing is it is being destroyed in front of us and we can't do anything except to raise awareness.