India Toilet Alert: India Fails to touch 50% toilet Target set by Modi Government

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
India Inc fails to touch 50% mark on PM's toilet target




toilet.jpg


The bench also rejected the explanation given by the state that there has been some compliance but it requires more time to comply with all the directions.


NEW DELHI: Corporate India and public sector undertakings are likely to fail Narendra Modi government's ambitious plan to have toilet in each and every school. With the August 15 deadline fast approaching, HRD ministry has decided to take help of state governments and if need be get directly involved in construction of toilets.

A senior HRD official said, "Eleven big corporates, 67 public sector undertakings including banks had taken the responsibility of constructing toilets but barring few, most have not yet reached even 50% mark." He said many companies have told government that due to fear of Naxal violence toilets cannot be constructed.

"But not all toilets fall in Naxal dominated areas. We have been let down," he said. The official also explained that though it expects corporate groups and PSUs to fulfill the obligation it is unlikely that it will happen.


48152948.cms


HRD ministry's data as of Monday showed that out of 138 toilets to be constructed by Confederation of Indian Industries (CII) only 23 have come up so far. Infosys Foundation was to construct 254 but have constructed only five. Mahindra Group has done better: It has constructed 671 out of 1,214 toilets approved for them. Tata Consultancy Services is among the best.

It has put in place 1,157 toilets out of 1,537 it had to construct. Some like FICCI has not constructed even a single toilet. It was to construct 119 toilets. Similarly, Titan Company Limited and Tata Steel also failed to construct even one toilet.

PSUs were asked to construct 1,47,548 toilets but so far only 49,577 have been constructed. Coal India had committed to construct 50,469 toilets but only 15,871 have come up. NTPC has completed only 9,664 toilets out of 25,410 assigned to them. Airports Authority of India has constructed a little over 10% of the toilets it had agreed to build. Rural Electrification Corporation has made only 3,795 toilets out of 14,626 it was to construct.

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...on-PMs-toilet-target/articleshow/48152940.cms
 
Last edited by a moderator:

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Re: India Toilet Alert: India Fails to touch 50% Mark on Modi's Toilet Target : Ache Din :)

.........----------
 

abhay

MPA (400+ posts)
UN Credits India For Managing To Reduce Its Defecation Rates And Imporving Resources Of Drinking Water


The United Nations reported that India has made progress in decreasing the defection rates in the country. More people in urban and rural areas now have access to improved quality of drinking water.
One out of every three or a total of 2.4 billion people on Earth are still without access to sanitation facilities, these figures include 946 million people who defecate in the open, according to a joint report titled Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water: 2015 Update and MDG Assessment which was released by the UN Childrens Fund and the World Health Organization.
The report states that India is among 16 countries that have managed to decrease defecation rates by 25%. India has shown a reduction of 31% which was termed in the report as a moderate decrease.
The report gave credit to other countries for significant improvement, in the Southern Region like Bangladesh, Nepal and Pakistan, who all have shown reduction of more than 30% since 1990, they had the highest numbers of open defecators.
As for India there has been no or very little change since the last 20 years, the report stated but India has met its goal of increasing drinking water resources for its people.
Nine other countries, including India, Pakistan, Belize, Egypt, Jordan, Mexico, Paraguay, Tunisia and Uganda have halved the proportion of the urban and rural population without improved drinking water.
India has managed to increase the rate of 71% in 1990 to 94% of the population who now have access to drinking water sources.
The report had it negatives too as it warned about the impact, of lack of progress in sanitation globally, on child survival and health benefits.
Maria Neira, Director of the WHO Department of Public Health, Environmental and Social Determinants of Health said Until everyone has access to adequate sanitation facilities, the quality of water supplies will be undermined and too many people will continue to die from water-borne and water-related diseases.

 

abhay

MPA (400+ posts)
A lack of toilets is leading to stunted growth in Pakistan, Unicef says

Published: 9 March 2015 10:30 PM
shortage of toilets in Pakistan is leading to a raft of problems in the country, according to Unicef, particularly with women.Unicef has warned Pakistan that the lack of toilets in the country leads to stunted growth, with over 40 million people in the country not having access to toilets, forcing them to defecate in the open.
During her recent visit to Pakistan, Unicef Deputy Executive Director Geeta Rao Gupta told the Associated Press: "There are 41 million people who do not have access to a toilet in Pakistan and as a result they are defecating in the open.
"And open defecation has significant health and nutritional consequences.”
Explaining the problem, she said that defecating in the open can spread disease and lead to intestinal infections, which ultimately contribute to stunting in young children.
"Open defecation is a major contributor to stunting and that's why we've got to do all we can to stop it," Gupta said.
After India and Indonesia, Pakistan is the third-largest country where people defecate in open due to lack of toilets.

Stunting means children don’t grow as tall as they would otherwise, and it also has an impact on a child’s brain development. Children with stunted growth are more vulnerable to diseases. In some case, stunted mothers give birth to stunted children.
Pakistan is working in coordination with Unicef to improve the sanitary
situation in the country. The two are also working with communities to aid them in building toilets.
Gupta claimed that building more toilets would not only help in empowering women but it would also contribute to rising female enrollment in school.
The Unicef official added that if women have to walk long distances to find a private place to relieve themselves, they are more vulnerable and exposed to attack, adding that they are also unlikely to go to school if there are no toilets.
"Having toilets is a big advantage to girls," she said. – Bernama, March 9, 2015.

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/...-leading-to-stunted-growth-in-pakistan-unicef
 
Last edited:

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
You need to step out of your false bravado before passing lame comments. Pakistan fares much better than India in terms of open defecation and here is a proof from your OWN Media admitting this :biggthumpup:

India Lags Behind Pakistan, Nepal on Sanitation



  • By
  • CORINNE ABRAMS
BN-JE547_toilet_G_20150701070302.jpg
The Wall Street Journal made with Datawrapper​
Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi has made sanitation a priority for his country, saying he would rather build toilets than temples and setting a goal for every home in the country to have a place to go to the bathroom by 2019.

But new data show India is lagging behind its neighbors in providing access to adequate sanitation.

Progress on Sanitation and Drinking Water,” a report published by the United Nations Children’s Fund and the World Health Organization this week, says that advancements in meeting Millennium Development Goals, or MDGs, by 2015 in relation to sanitation have faltered worldwide. The report says 2.4 billion people still don’t have access to improved sanitation.


Mr. Modi launched his Clean India, or Swachh Bharat, campaign last year for good reason. Research shows that the practice of open defecation is linked to a higher risk of stunting in children and the spread of disease. A World Health Organization report said in 2014 that 597 million people in India still relieved themselves outdoors. And the new WHO/Unicef report says that the Southern Asia region has the highest number of people who defecate in the open.

The new data show that despite recent efforts, over the past 25 years, India has been losing the regional race to improve sanitation.

Its neighbors, Nepal, Bangladesh and Pakistan led the way with the greatest percentage-point change in the proportion of the population with access to improved sanitation facilities between 1990 and 2015.

Pakistan’s percentage point change was 40–64% of people have use an improved sanitation facility. In Nepal, a country in which just 4% of people had access to improved sanitation facilities in 1990, access rose by 42 percentage points to 46%. Bangladesh improved its score by 27 percentage points — 61% now have access to improved sanitation facilities.

India meanwhile, had a lower 23 percentage point increase in the same period – bringing the number of people with access to improved sanitation facilities to 40%.
And Sri Lanka is way ahead, with 95% of people having access to improved sanitation.

The report defines an improved sanitation facility as one that hygienically separates excreta from human contact and the target was for 50% or more of those with inadequate water or sanitation in 1990 to have adequate sanitary services in 2015.

Likewise, rates of open defecation have reduced, but India still has the highest percentage of the population defecating in the open–with 44% of people going outside in 2015—down from 75% in 1990, compared with a 13% figure for Pakistan in 2015, 32% for Nepal and only 1% for Bangladesh.

But, the report says: “The 31 per cent reduction in open defecation in India alone represents 394 million people, and significantly influences regional and global estimates.”

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/...on-PMs-toilet-target/articleshow/48152940.cms






A lack of toilets is leading to stunted growth in Pakistan, Unicef says

Published: 9 March 2015 10:30 PM
shortage of toilets in Pakistan is leading to a raft of problems in the country, according to Unicef, particularly with women.Unicef has warned Pakistan that the lack of toilets in the country leads to stunted growth, with over 40 million people in the country not having access to toilets, forcing them to defecate in the open.
During her recent visit to Pakistan, Unicef Deputy Executive Director Geeta Rao Gupta told the Associated Press: "There are 41 million people who do not have access to a toilet in Pakistan and as a result they are defecating in the open.
"And open defecation has significant health and nutritional consequences.”
Explaining the problem, she said that defecating in the open can spread disease and lead to intestinal infections, which ultimately contribute to stunting in young children.
"Open defecation is a major contributor to stunting and that's why we've got to do all we can to stop it," Gupta said.
After India and Indonesia, Pakistan is the third-largest country where people defecate in open due to lack of toilets.

Stunting means children don’t grow as tall as they would otherwise, and it also has an impact on a child’s brain development. Children with stunted growth are more vulnerable to diseases. In some case, stunted mothers give birth to stunted children.
Pakistan is working in coordination with Unicef to improve the sanitary
situation in the country. The two are also working with communities to aid them in building toilets.
Gupta claimed that building more toilets would not only help in empowering women but it would also contribute to rising female enrollment in school.
The Unicef official added that if women have to walk long distances to find a private place to relieve themselves, they are more vulnerable and exposed to attack, adding that they are also unlikely to go to school if there are no toilets.
"Having toilets is a big advantage to girls," she said. – Bernama, March 9, 2015.

http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/...-leading-to-stunted-growth-in-pakistan-unicef
 
Last edited:

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Here mr. glass house another royal slap hurled towards your house [hilar][hilar]

Pakistan among 95 Countries to have Met Sanitation MDG

WASH-Generic-Image--AZ.jpg

Islamabad, 2 July 2015: Pakistan is one of the 95 countries that have met the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) target for sanitation aimed at halving the proportion of the population without sustainable access to basic sanitation, says a recently launched global report by the World Health Organisation (WHO) and the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF) Joint Monitoring Programme (JMP).
According to the report, 64 per cent of the population in Pakistan now has access to sanitation compared to 24 per cent in 1990. A feat achieved by only 95 countries so far. Pakistan is also placed among just 77 countries which have met both the drinking water and the sanitation MDG target. The number of people defecating in the open has been reduced from 46 to 25 million during the last decade. However, closing the gap that exists due to inequities between urban and rural residents in terms of improved access to water and sanitation services, remains a challenge.

“This is an incredible achievement,” says Angela Kearney, UNICEF Representative in Pakistan. “Toilet use is becoming the new norm in rural Pakistan. A country on the road to modernity with unprecedented uptake of toilets, has met the sanitation MDG. I would like to congratulate the Government of Pakistan and its development partners on achieving this all important goal. The Government’s leadership and commitment to improve access to sanitation through increased investment and supporting national and provincial level dialogue on the subject, has provided the required impetus for achieving this target which will go a long way in protecting women and children as well as overall national development.”

While providing a comprehensive assessment of progress made since 1990, the report also highlights what more needs to be done to help the 2.4 billion people globally who still lack access to improved sanitation and at the same time urgently address the large disparities that exist in this context. Despite significant progress, South Asia is still the region where the largest number of people, nearly 953 million, do not have access to improved sanitation.

It is noteworthy that earlier this year, the second Pakistan Conference on Sanitation (PACOSAN) was hosted in Islamabad where a large gathering of eminent specialists deliberated on accelerating Pakistan’s move towards achieving the sanitation MDG. Addressing the inaugural session of the conference, the President of Pakistan, Mr. Mamnoon Hussain highlighted that despite strong emphasis on cleanliness in Islam, lack of sanitation facilities is one of the major causes of high child mortality rate in Pakistan. He urged all stakeholders to join hands for universal coverage of sanitation and hygiene in the country.
###

About UNICEF

UNICEF promotes the rights and wellbeing of every child, in everything we do. Together with our partners, we work in 190 countries and territories to translate that commitment into practical action, focusing special effort on reaching the most vulnerable and excluded children, to the benefit of all children, everywhere. For more information about UNICEF and its work visit: www.unicef.org. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook

For more information, please contact:
Daniel Timme, Chief, Advocacy and Communication UNICEF Pakistan, Tel; 0300 500 8525 Email: [email protected]
A. Sami Malik, Communication Specialist, Tel: 0300 8556654, Email:

http://www.unicef.org/pakistan/media_9451.htm

people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones....[/QUOTE]
 

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
This statement seals the fate for India on how a country should go about Improving sanitation :biggthumpup::

“This is an incredible achievement,” says Angela Kearney, UNICEF Representative in Pakistan. “Toilet use is becoming the new norm in rural Pakistan. A country on the road to modernity with unprecedented uptake of toilets, has met the sanitation MDG. I would like to congratulate the Government of Pakistan and its development partners on achieving this all important goal. The Government’s leadership and commitment to improve access to sanitation through increased investment and supporting national and provincial level dialogue on the subject, has provided the required impetus for achieving this target which will go a long way in protecting women and children as well as overall national development.”
 

abhay

MPA (400+ posts)
where did I say that you are doing bad than We are doing in this regard but it does not mean that you doesn't posses the problem?

and you are trying to make fun of us as if you belong to some European country, there is problem and our government is trying to address

that and not shying away from it.

only last year we made more than 50 million toilet alone.

there are many human index indicators I can post here that says India is doing much better that you.

I don't get the point of thread other than earn brownie points.
 

abhay

MPA (400+ posts)
State of Children: Pakistani child mortality rates nearly twice as high as India’s

By Qaiser Butt
Published: July 18, 2015

922782-pakistanchildrendiseasex-1437162037-145-640x480.jpg

Despite progress, the country is not doing as well as its regional counterparts. PHOTO: AFP


ISLAMABAD: A Pakistani child is almost twice as likely to die before his or her fifth birthday as an Indian child. Despite significant improvements over the past two decades, Pakistan ranks towards the bottom among countries in the world when it comes to infant and neonatal mortality, according to a report issued by the United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef).

According to the 2014 State of Children in Pakistan report, one in every 14 Pakistani children (7.1%) die before their first birthday, and one in every 11 (9.1%) do not survive to their fifth birthday. In 1990, the proportion of children who died before the age of one – the infant mortality rate – was 10.6%, and those who did not make it to the age of five – the under-five mortality rate – was 13.8%. While these numbers represent a dramatic improvement over the past two decades, they are still much worse than even comparable countries around the world.
7.11.jpg

In India, for instance, the infant mortality rate in 2012 was much lower at 4.4% and even the under-five mortality rate was at 5.6%. In 1990, India did start off with lower rates for both than Pakistan – 12.6% and 8.8%, respectively – but has made more progress in reducing both numbers.
The mortality rates among children are often seen as a proxy for the level of social development in a country, since they reflect the level of nutrition, parents’ education, and access to health services. The report, the second such study on Pakistan’s children by Unicef, cites a lack of clean water and sanitation facilities as one of the biggest impediments in reducing child mortality.
Lack of access to clean water and sanitation facilities has a wide range of impact on children’s health and the current status of sanitation and poor hygiene practices has led to significant public costs, such as premature deaths, economic and financial costs due to diseases attributable to poor sanitation, environmental costs, and other welfare costs.
9.11.jpg

As one of the most powerless groups in society, children often bear the physical and emotional costs of poverty. Poverty experienced by children can affect the rest of their lives, and is more often passed from generation to generation, affecting the long-term health, well-being, and productivity of families as well as society as a whole.
Low levels of education compel families to engage in labour-intensive, low-paying jobs that generate insufficient income to satisfy the needs of the family. The distress and poor health conditions that result from the imbalance between household demands and parents’ ability to satisfy those demands pushes children into work and a lifelong struggle to meet levels of even basic subsistence and robs them of their basic rights to education, good health, and safety.
The challenges to child protection as a result of poverty and inequality are more difficult to overcome when they are compounded by social exclusion and discrimination. Poverty also undermines support systems, whether these are the informal structure that would normally provide mutual support among community members in hard times, or formal structures such as economic safety nets and social services, especially where government lacks the capacity and resources to make these measures effective.
Children growing up in poverty are less likely to access basic social services of quality or to benefit from preventive initiatives or protection mechanisms.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/922782/...rtality-rates-nearly-twice-as-high-as-indias/
 

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
You are the one talking about "Glass houses " :biggthumpup:...not me.

I just posted a news on how India inc failed to achieve its toilet target FROM YOUR OWN MEDIA. But i think you took offense to this news being posted by a Pakistani, as you would be perfectly fine reading it in your own newspaper.

So the point of the thread is to show why you indians hate pakistanis soo much that you cant even stand "rightfull" news coming out of your own media :biggthumpup:

I just stated a news, but you made a competition out of it. I have every right to post what i feel like posting and you have every right to comment. BUt you must learn to take an argument without getting emotionally involved like you did .

there is no denying india maybe better in some indicators just like some african country maybe better than India in some other indicators, but we are NOT discussing that on this thread, and when were not doing that then you mentioning it is mere stupidity. If you feel like comparing other stuff then start a thread and do so, but please learn to be respectfull of a thread topic!!:biggthumpup:


where did I say that you are doing bad than We are doing in this regard but it does not mean that you doesn't posses the problem?

and you are trying to make fun of us as if you belong to some European country, there is problem and our government is trying to address

that and not shying away from it.

only last year we made more than 50 million toilet alone.

there are many human index indicators I can post here that says India is doing much better that you.

I don't get the point of thread other than earn brownie points.
 

Humi

Prime Minister (20k+ posts)
people who live in glass houses shouldn't throw stones....

Its more about felling good about ourselves because someone is in worst condition than us..its quite an ugly but sadly realistic face of humanity..
 

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
See. like i said ...your here for a pissing contest based on your ingrained HATRED :biggthumpup:....anyways your post is irrelevant to the topic of the thread but their are several metrics beyond sanitation where pakistan is better than INdia :biggthumpup:

Here enjoy :


Pakistan better than India on UNDP gender inequality index


Share Tweet

Pakistan better than India on UNDP gender inequality index

By Manahyl Khan
Published: March 15, 2013

Pakistan and neighbouring countries on the Gender Inequality Index from UNDP's Human Development Report 2013.

Pakistan ranked 123 on the gender inequality index of the United Nations Development Programme’s (UNDP) 2013 Human Development Report. Pakistan finished better on the gender front than stronger economies such as India (132) and Egypt (126), even though it ranks lower in the overall Human Development Index (HDI).

According to the report, the gender inequality index is a composite measure reflecting inequality in achievements between women and men in three dimensions: reproductive health, empowerment and the labour market.

Value index

The value index provides an indicator of the depth of participation in global markets. More than four-fifths of these developing countries increased their trade to output ratio between 1990 and 2012.
In the HDI value index, Pakistan has been recognised to have shown “substantial improvement”.
The report states, “among the exceptions in the subgroup that also made substantial improvement in HDI value are Indonesia, Pakistan and Venezuela, three large countries that are considered global players in world markets, exporting or importing from at least 80 economies”.




State of Children: Pakistani child mortality rates nearly twice as high as India’s

By Qaiser Butt
Published: July 18, 2015


ISLAMABAD: A Pakistani child is almost twice as likely to die before his or her fifth birthday as an Indian child. Despite significant improvements over the past two decades, Pakistan ranks towards the bottom among countries in the world when it comes to infant and neonatal mortality, according to a report issued by the United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef).

According to the 2014 State of Children in Pakistan report, one in every 14 Pakistani children (7.1%) die before their first birthday, and one in every 11 (9.1%) do not survive to their fifth birthday. In 1990, the proportion of children who died before the age of one – the infant mortality rate – was 10.6%, and those who did not make it to the age of five – the under-five mortality rate – was 13.8%. While these numbers represent a dramatic improvement over the past two decades, they are still much worse than even comparable countries around the world.
7.11.jpg

In India, for instance, the infant mortality rate in 2012 was much lower at 4.4% and even the under-five mortality rate was at 5.6%. In 1990, India did start off with lower rates for both than Pakistan – 12.6% and 8.8%, respectively – but has made more progress in reducing both numbers.
The mortality rates among children are often seen as a proxy for the level of social development in a country, since they reflect the level of nutrition, parents’ education, and access to health services. The report, the second such study on Pakistan’s children by Unicef, cites a lack of clean water and sanitation facilities as one of the biggest impediments in reducing child mortality.
Lack of access to clean water and sanitation facilities has a wide range of impact on children’s health and the current status of sanitation and poor hygiene practices has led to significant public costs, such as premature deaths, economic and financial costs due to diseases attributable to poor sanitation, environmental costs, and other welfare costs.
9.11.jpg

As one of the most powerless groups in society, children often bear the physical and emotional costs of poverty. Poverty experienced by children can affect the rest of their lives, and is more often passed from generation to generation, affecting the long-term health, well-being, and productivity of families as well as society as a whole.
Low levels of education compel families to engage in labour-intensive, low-paying jobs that generate insufficient income to satisfy the needs of the family. The distress and poor health conditions that result from the imbalance between household demands and parents’ ability to satisfy those demands pushes children into work and a lifelong struggle to meet levels of even basic subsistence and robs them of their basic rights to education, good health, and safety.
The challenges to child protection as a result of poverty and inequality are more difficult to overcome when they are compounded by social exclusion and discrimination. Poverty also undermines support systems, whether these are the informal structure that would normally provide mutual support among community members in hard times, or formal structures such as economic safety nets and social services, especially where government lacks the capacity and resources to make these measures effective.
Children growing up in poverty are less likely to access basic social services of quality or to benefit from preventive initiatives or protection mechanisms.

http://tribune.com.pk/story/922782/...rtality-rates-nearly-twice-as-high-as-indias/


 

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
ah ah ahhh ....dont be counting your chickens before they are hatched ...i still love using as many emoticons ...here how do you like THIS : [hilar][hilar][hilar][hilar]

I am amazed you had an increase in your IQ. From using :biggthumpup: emoticon all the time, you have progressed to another one [hilar]

Keep it up
 

Shamyl Sheheryar

MPA (400+ posts)
Not only you have progressed in language, you have started promoting your own breed before they are hatched. Must admit intelligence quotient is going further up [hilar]:biggthumpup:

ah ah ahhh ....dont be counting your chickens before they are hatched ...i still love using as many emoticons ...here how do you like THIS : [hilar][hilar][hilar][hilar]
 

modern.fakir

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
i am glad that you have evolved enough to notice to my true nature [hilar][hilar][hilar]

Not only you have progressed in language, you have started promoting your own breed before they are hatched. Must admit intelligence quotient is going further up [hilar]:biggthumpup:
 

abhay

MPA (400+ posts)
fudging data
this is more recent and accurete data from your own sources


http://www.dawn.com/news/1140919



Pakistan at bottom in gender equality global ranking


544f3ed472093.jpg
This picture shows a woman posing with her child at site of a brick factory in Mandra, near Rawalpindi. File photo/AP

A global report shows that Pakistani women still face the world's worst inequality in access to health care, education and work.
The annual Gender Gap Index by the Geneva-based World Economic Forum released Tuesday showed Pakistan ranked 141 out of 142, second to last in global gender equality.
This is the third year in a trot that Pakistan has maintained the second to last ranking.
The only country where women face worse equality issues is Yemen.
Neighbouring India's ranking falling from 101st out of 136 countries surveyed last year to 114th out of 142 countries this year.
The United States rose three places to rank 20th, while Yemen and Chad remained at the bottom.
Nordic nations lead the world again in promoting equality of the sexes, with Iceland, Finland, Norway, Sweden and Denmark in the top five spots.

544fb564ef04d.jpg
544fb45f7667a.jpg
544fb559c874a.jpg
544f613414be2.jpg



 

Mobeen Ahmad

Voter (50+ posts)
حیرانگی کی بات ہے کہ انڈیا کے ٹائلٹس پر اتنی لمبی بحث۔۔۔
پاکستان میں بہت سے ایشوز ہیں بحث کرنے کیلئے۔۔
(yapping)
 
Sponsored Link