A Truely Historic Document

UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
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Please do not move to some dark and distant corner of Siasat.PK

At least for few days

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UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
In just over seven years, from 1940 to 1947,
Quaid-e-Azam Mohammad Ali Jinnah transformed
Asia. He woke sleeping giants, the Muslims of South
Asia, and gave them a free homeland they had never
dreamed of. He ended their slavery, which had
consumed their vitality, dignity and wealth for nearly
two centuries since their treacherous defeat at Plassey
in 1757. He gave them back their pride as a ruling
power of the vast sub-continent for over 1000 years.
In the words of historian Stanley Wolpert: “Few
individuals significantly alter the course of history.
Fewer still modify the map of the world. Hardly any
one can be credited with creating a nation-state.
Mohammad Ali Jinnah did all three.” These are the
most astounding historical developments any one of
anxious readers is likely to experience and ask: What
was the kind of man who could do what he has done.
This book is an attempt to answer that question
by looking at that remarkable man through a window
of his personal habits, traits and attitudes.
This window has been opened by a person no
less than Quaid-e-Azam’s own trusted Aide-de-Camp

Mian Ata Rabbani. Inside the window we see an
extraordinarily elegant, graceful, tastefully dressed,
tall, handsome, erect and witty man with a monocle
on grey silk cord and a stiff white collar which the
famous British journalist Beverly Nicholas saw him
wearing even in the hottest weather of Bombay in
1944.
These are manifestations of his outside
elegance. What was his inside like? The more you
read about the day-to-day characteristics, attributes
and temperament of the charismatic personality inside
the window, the more closeness you find between his
outside elegance and inside flawless approach to life.
Confident, indomitable, steadfast, resolute,
impeccable, unpurchaseable, courageous, full of pride!
You keep coming across many other superlatives; a
man of cold logic, deft reasoning and topmost legal
brain, superbly eloquent, invincible, unconquerable.
These statements are not false ornaments of flattery.
They have come directly from the heart of the author
and his well-researched knowledge.
What to talk of the author? Even contemporaries
of Quaid-e-Azam were full of amazement at the
strength of his character and did not hesitate to shower
lavish praises over his achievements. The celebrated
British diplomat Lord Listowel rated Mr. Jinnah as a
bigger political giant of the twentieth century than
even General de Gaulle. American President Harry S.
Truman considered him as the recipient of a devotion
of loyalty seldom accorded to any man. His highness
Sir Agha Khan III said of him: “Of all the statesmen
that I have known in my life—Clemenceau, Lloyd
George, Churchill, Curzon, Mussolini, Mahatama
Gandhi—Jinnah is most remarkable. None of these
men in my view outshown him in strength of character
and that almost scanny combination of precision and
resolution.” Even Quaid-e-Azam’s bitter critics
considered him as outweighing Truman, Stalin, and
Attle put together (Daily Amrit Bazar Patrika of 8th
August 1947) and as hard as diamond with all the
diamond’s brilliance (Daily Statesman).
Peeping through the pages of this book the
reader will see Mian Ata Rabbani in a constant state
of love and mesmerism while serving Quaid-e-Azam
as his Aide-de-Camp. He found his job as the
toughest, hardest and at times most grinding but loved
every moment of it for it turned out to be most
rewarding, engaging, exciting and enjoyable. And
why it should not have been so because he was
spending the most precious moments of his life with a
man whom Beverly Nicholas called as the most
important man in Asia who could sway the battle of
politics in Asia this way or that as he chose, for his
100 million Muslims would move to the left, to the
right, to the front, to the rear at his bidding, and
nobody else’s.
Mian Ata Rabbani deserves thanks of the entire
nation for capturing some precious moments of
Quaid-e-Azam’s life and character as he saw them,
thereby enabling the reader to have a deeper view of
who the man of destiny was and why he succeeded in
achieving what he achieved.
Dr. Rafique Ahmed
Vice Chairman

PREFACE
Pakistan gave Muslims of the Sub-Continent an
identity and an Independent homeland as a safe haven.
The architect of the “Miracle of the Twentieth Century” is
no other than Quaid-e-Azam Muhammad Ali Jinnah. In
this book certain selected articles written by me from time
to time, on and about the Quaid-e-Azam are clubbed
together for the benefit of readers particularly the young
students. These articles are not part of any mini-biography
of the Great Leader whom Beverly Nichols called “A
Giant” but only dwell on certain facets of his sterling
character.
I was his “Aide” for seven months from August 7th,
1947 to March 1948, when I stood behind him and
watched the nostalgic events of the birth of Pakistan from
the grand stand. Such opportunities come very rarely in
one’s life time.
Pakistan is sixty one years old now but during this
short span of time it has drifted from its moorings. The
sad part of this misfortune is that our younger generations
are oblivious of the “Why” of Pakistan. The innocent
youngsters perhaps imagine that this comfortable and
plentiful life that they live in and enjoy today had always
been all milk and honey even in pre-independence days in
India. It had never been so.

It is need of the hour to familiarize the younger
generations with the “Why” of Pakistan. In this exercise
the focus has to be on the Person of Jinnah, the Quaid-e-
Azam who changed the map of the world to our benefit.
Jinnah and Pakistan are synonymous.
The task is stupendous. All credit to Nazaria-i-
Pakistan Trust Lahore who under guidance of its Chairman
Mr. Majeed Nizami and Dr. Rafique Ahmad the energetic
and innovative Vice Chairman took this task in hand with
great success. The Trust has published a number of books,
booklets, brochures and pamphlets on Quaid-e-Azam and
Nazaria-i-Pakistan. I personally appreciate Dr. Rafique
Ahmad’s initiative in collaborating some of my articles
published in the media on national days, in the form of a
book. I am sure it will interest the youngsters and help
them know about some facets of Quaid-e-Azam’s
character and basics of the ideology of Pakistan.
Readers please bear in mind that the book is neither
a biography nor history, so you may not find continuity in
the text. It is a collection of articles written from time to
time spreading over a number of years with inevitable
repetition of certain facts in various articles. Keeping this
fact in view, each article should be read independent of
each other.
Ata Rabbani
Karachi,
September 26, 2008


MY LEADER
Muhammad Ali Jinnah was born on December 25,
1876, in Wazir Mansion, New Naham Road, Khara-Dar,
Karachi. He took his early education in Sindh Madrassatul-
Islam, Karachi. Muhammad Ali was 16 years old and
student of Fifth Standard English (under matriculation)
when in 1883 he left for England for studies and
apprenticeship in business administration in the head
office of Graham Trading Co. He joined Lincoln’s Inn
and graduated from there in two years with distinction.
Mr. Jinnah once confided that “he was the youngest
student ever to be called to the Bar”.
He grew up to be tall, handsome, erect, graceful
with chiseled features like a Greek God. He was always
elegantly and tastefully dressed. He wore Savil-Row
tailored suits and the silk cord of his monocle matching
the colour of the suit that he wore. This appendix of his
dress became known all over as was the ‘Windsor knot’ of
then Prince of Wales. British Viceroys like Harding,
Chelmsford, Reading and Halifax all thought that Mr.
Jinnah was “the best dressed gentleman they ever met in
India”.
Mr. Jinnah was always self confident, indomitable
and full of pride and as a matter of principle he would

never entertain favours from anyone, or accept any giveaway
as gesture of benevolence.
Early in his professional career, at the expiry of six
months temporary assignment of the vacant post of
Presidency Magistrate, when Sir Charles Ollivant,
member for the Bombay Executive Council offered him a
permanent job at a higher salary, he spurned the offer
saying, “Soon, I will be daily earning that much amount,
that you have offered me”. Such was his confidence and
faith in his ability and the world saw that within a couple
of years he was one of the highest paid lawyer in the
country.
Lord Reading, the Viceroy of India offered him
Knighthood, which Mr. Jinnah declined saying that he
prefers to be called plain Mr. Jinnah than Sir Muhammad
Ali Jinnah. It is interesting to know that after Mr. Jinnah’s
refusal to be Knighted, when Lord Reading at an informal
reception, turned to Mrs. Maryam (Ratti) Jinnah and
asked her to request her husband to agree to be Knighted,
she promptly retorted, “If my husband accepts
Knighthood, I will ask separation from him”.
Years later, Mr. Ramzay MacDonald, the British
Prime Minister, said to Mr. Jinnah, “You know that we
are hoping to grant self-government to India and I shall
need men like you to be Governors of Provinces”. Mr.
Jinnah promptly replied back, “Mr. MacDonald, are you

trying to bribe me?” It was against Mr. Jinnah’s grain to
accept favours.
Mr. Muhammad Ali Jinnah, Bar-at-Law, made his
debut in politics as a staunch nationalist. Within a short
period of his joining the Congress in 1905 he made his
mark and was soon counted as one of its front rank
leaders. With his true nationalistic approach to politics he
came to be known as ‘Ambassador of Hindu-Muslim
unity’.
The question then intrigued; what was it that
changed Mr. Jinnah’s thinking so radically? There must
have been some thing very fundamental that disillusioned
this “Ambassador of Hindu-Muslim Unity and idol of
young Indian nationalists of 1920s” and turned him into
an avid champion of the interest of his community. Mr.
H.V. Hodson, an eminent British historian sums up Mr.
Jinnah’s character thus, “One thing is certain he did not
change for any venal motive. Not even his political
enemies ever accused Jinnah of corruption or self-seeking.
He could be bought by no one, and for no price…… He
was a steadfast idealist as well as a man of scrupulous
honour.”
He could not be bought, he could not be lured, then
what was it that brought this radical change in Mr. Jinnah?
The answer to this question of change of his ideals lie in
the deeds, rather ‘misdeeds’ and behaviour of the
Congress leaders. He became thoroughly disenchanted
16
with the two-faced policies and distinct contradictions in
the lofty ideals professed in public and actual deeds of the
so called “nationalist” Hindu leaders. The History of the
Congress is replete with instances of deliberate efforts to
undermine Muslim interests with a view to amalgamating
their separate identity in the bigger whole. To enumerate a
few examples:-
• Congress’ opposition to separate electorates.
• Opposition to and later agitation against the
partition of Bengal which eventually they
got annulled in 1911.
• Repudiation of the Luckhnow Pacts.
• Rejection of Jinnah’s Fourteen Points.
• Refusal to form Coalition Ministries with
Muslim League in the Provinces where the
Congress won majorities in the 1937
elections, as assured both by the Congress
and the British Government in discussions
that preceded the 1935 India Act.
• Imposition of Hindu Culture in Government
offices and educational institutions in
Congress government provinces.
• Introduction of Wardha Scheme Primary
education.

• The launching of a mass contact movement
amongst the Muslims by-passing the League
and all other Muslim leaders.
Disgusted with the hypocrisy and double standards
of the top brass of the Congress leadership, Mr. Jinnah left
for London in October 1930 to settle and start his legal
practice there before the Privy Council.
The thirties was a crucial period for the Muslim
community in the subcontinent when Muslim politics was
in a state of flux and they were heartlessly being tossed
about in the stormy winds of politics and they drifted
aimlessly like a rudderless ship in the angry sea of
politics. At this time of despair and despondency when all
seemed lost, there appeared on the dark horizon, a silver
streak of hope. Mr. Jinnah was persuaded to return home
to assume the stewardship of the battered and demoralized
Muslims. He returned to India in 1934 and appeared on
the scene like a super star, a star of hope for the Muslims
and one destined to dominate the future political scene in
the sub-continent.
Within a very short time of his return from his selfimposed
exile in England, this idol of the young Indian
Nationalists of the twenties, now turned into a champion
of the hitherto neglected cause of the Muslims. He
assumed the key role in the political life of the
subcontinent. It was however, in March 1936 and the
venue was Delhi when Mr. M.A Jinnah finally decided

upon his future course of action and sounded a clarion call
to the Muslims to unite. He said, “We must think of the
interests of our community…..….. The Musalmans and
Hindus must be organized separately and once they are
organized thus, they will understand each other”. This was
a turning point in the history of the sub-continent.
The die was cast and from this point of time
onwards there was no obstacle insurmountable. The
response from the Muslim masses was historic and they
rose as one man at his call and like a storm swept
everything before them.
Inspite of his frail health the Quaid-e-Azam
worked tirelessly and galvanized the Muslims of India
into a nation. The name of Quaid-e-Azam acquired a
magnetic perception for the Muslims of India, they trusted
him and reposed complete faith and confidence in his
judgment and the advocacy of their cause. The Nation was
now ready, he gathered the pieces that were drifting in the
wind of political wilderness and molded them into a
powerful and solid whole. The Muslims now became a
political force to be reckoned with, both by the Hindus
and those sitting in the Viceregal Lodge.
Every passing day increased the popularity of Mr.
Jinnah and Muslim India’s faith in his leadership and
ability to deliver the goods on their behalf. The snowball
action started and the Muslims flocked to swell the ranks
of the Muslim League. The so called Nationalist Muslim

leaders stood isolated. The Muslim community now stood
as one behind the “Man of Destiny”. It was now 1940. He
decided that the time was now ripe to indicate its
“destination” to the Muslims of the subcontinent.
On March 23, 1940, under the shadows of the
majestic Badshahi Mosque at Lahore, he said:-
“….........We stand unequivocally for the freedom
of India. But it must be freedom of all India and
not freedom of one section, for worse still, of
the congress caucus and slavery of Musalmans
and other minorities”. “……… I appeal to you, to
organize yourself in such a way that you may
depend upon none except your own inherent
strength. That is your only safeguard and the
best safeguard. Depend upon yourself”.
Pre-empting British thinking on the future
constitution he warned the British:-
“…….We and we alone wish to be the final
arbiter, we do not want that the British
government should thrust upon the Musalmans
a constitution which they do not approve of and
to which they do not agree…….. I make it plain
from this platform, that if any declaration is
made; if any interim settlement is made without
our approval and without our consent, the
Musalmans of India will resist, and no mistake
should be made on that score.”

Elaborating the point of NATIONHOOD and the
demand of a separate HOMELAND he argued:-
“…….. It has always been taken for granted
mistakenly, that Musalmans are a minority. The
Musalmans are not a minority. The Musalmans
are a nation by any definition. Even according to
the British map of India, we occupy large parts
of the country, where the Musalmans are in
majority………..such as Bengal, Punjab, NWFP,
Sind and Baluchistan……………..the Hindus and
Musalmans belongs to two different religious
philosophies, social customs, literatures…….they
belong to two different civilizations…….their
aspects on life and of life are different…Hindus
and Musalmans derive their inspiration from
two different sources of history. They have
different epics, different heroes, and different
episodes, very often the hero of one is a foe of
the other and like wise the unity of India dates
back only to the British conquest and
maintained by the British bayonet……….”
Winding up his case for a separate homeland for
his Nation he summoned up thus:-
“…….Musalmans are a nation according to any
definition of a nation and they must have their
homeland, their territory and their state.”
Turning to his people he said:-

“……… I have placed before you the task that
lies ahead of us. Do you realize how big and
stupendous it is. Do you realize that you cannot
get freedom or independence by mere
arguments? …………….come forward as servants
of Islam, organize the people economically,
socially, educationally and politically and i am
sure that you will be a power that will be
accepted by everybody”.
Thunderous applause and Quaid-e-Azam
‘Zindabad’ and Pakistan ‘Zindabad’ slogans ranted the air
of Lahore.
Mr. Jinnah, a brilliant and astute lawyer that he
was, his natural gift of eloquence, cool thinking, coldblooded
logic of his arguments, forceful style of
advocacy, dauntless courage combined with political
foresight that he was endowed with, made Mr. Jinnah the
key figure in the politics of the country from then on.
With his political sense and acumen he could foresee
things far beyond, much ahead of any one else. During
Congress/League negotiations in the forties when all the
‘wise men’ of the Congress Working Committee would sit
together for days to make out the Congress case; whereas
Mr. Jinnah’s response on behalf of the Muslim League
would come within a day or so that would outsmart them
all. The one man ‘think tank’ of Muslim India would sit
down and calmly dictate replies to these communications

from the All India Congress Committee. Tackling
dexterously, point by point, all their salient propositions
and demolishing their arguments one by one, the Quaid in
his characteristic style, at the same time, would be
building up his own case with logic and deft reasoning.
He would in his counter attack thus throw the Congress on
the defensive or even force it to retreat. He was like the
Grand Master making his subtle moves on the political
chess board of the subcontinent.
He knew the weaknesses of his people, was aware
of the organizational deficiencies that the Musalmans
suffered from and he was also conscious of the vacillating
nature of most of the Muslims, they only like to talk and
no constructive thinking or actions. Some even scoffed at
his proposed “destination”. He was very sure and said,
“We shall achieve Pakistan and of course, he who laughs
last, laughs the best”. The whole world saw that within a
short span of only five and half years, from the day of this
prediction the word “shall” was turned into the word ,
‘have’, when the Nation could proudly claim, ‘We have
established our Pakistan’. His prophesy came true. Such
was the kind of rapport that this Man of Destiny had with
Destiny.
His critics may call him cold, aloof and even
arrogant; but it is only this far that they could go and no
more. Even the most bitter opponents of Mr. Jinnah could
not help but admit the sterling qualities of his character,

uprightness, integrity, and incorruptibility. They knew he
would never compromise on principles.
The creation of Pakistan is often referred to as a
miracle of the twentieth century. It is rightly so, besides,
many political, economic, ethnic and social impediments,
the Colonial powers holding the subcontinent to ransom
were against the division of India. History bears testimony
to the fact that India was never one, it was never a unified
whole. His Majesty’s Government, however for reasons
best known to them, was keen to preserve the artificial
unity of their Indian empire. Some of the contemporary
British writers taking their cue from the White-hall, took
the same line. Maybe, they genuinely believed in it and
liked to think of India as an indivisible whole. As such,
any person working against this concept was dubbed by
them as ‘rigid’ and ‘stubborn’ and Mr. Jinnah, to them
was that person. In doing so they betrayed history and
maligned their profession. The defaced version of history
may only have a temporary impact but truth must prevail
in the end and Mr. Jinnah is a shining example of this
dictum. No person, no matter how mighty his pen, can
tarnish the image of Mr. Jinnah.
“Noor-e-Khuda hai kufar ki harkat peh khanda zun
Phoonkon say yeh charagh bujhaya na jai ga”.
(Daily THE NEWS, September 11, 2002)



there is much more if anyone is interested !!!
*****
 
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AsifAmeer

Siasat.pk - Blogger
Lekin dont you think dividing Muslims or forcing them to leave India to migrate to the other side, was wrong?



Dost what I LOVE about this is how simple he kept it

Profession Simply Barrister

Address very Simple

And Signature

Simply M A Jinnah

Greatness which says this is who I am


Nothing more or nothing less
 

UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Lekin dont you think dividing Muslims or forcing them to leave India to migrate to the other side, was wrong?


Lesser of two evils, and better than leaving a substantial minority at the mercy of the majority, with no love lost between the two

PS I would find it difficult to live in a Country where this is considered worship

 

Keepinformed

Siasat.pk - Blogger
Lets face it.

Jinnah was to muslims of India as

1. Altaf Hussain is to Urdu Speaking.
2. Sindh Nationalists are to Sindhis.
3. Baluch separatists are to Baluchis.
4. Taliban are to Pathans and South Punjabis.
5. Sunnis are to Shias.
6. Sunni and Shias are to Qadyanis.
7. British South Asians are to White British people.
8. Wife is to an ignoring husband.


Divide, divide and then divide some more.....Division is only natural...religion, color, race, language all play a part in it.

Lets reverse engineer it and find more common grounds such as business, cross provincial and international marriages.

images



 
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Vitamin_C

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Sorry Yar

But well do you know you can get SEVEN years for rearing beef with a view to a burger in the distant future, in some states of India !!

And I do like the odd burger

Add up the Muslim population of Kashmir, Pakistan, India and Bangladesh. Compare that with the Hindus or Sikh population in the whole subcontinent. I think if Muslims hadn't separated 64 years ago we would have been the majority by now. By dividing ourselves we only got weaker.
 

UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Add up the Muslim population of Kashmir, Pakistan, India and Bangladesh. Compare that with the Hindus or Sikh population in the whole subcontinent. I think if Muslims hadn't separated 64 years ago we would have been the majority by now. By dividing ourselves we only got weaker.

With respect I do not think so. Combined Muslims would still be outnumbered

BUT that is not what it was about.It assumes us against them,inthat if we were in the majority, all the muslims wouldvote for muslims and hindus for hindus and democracy would prevail and we would rule

Would you really like to live somewhere where that was the case. It leads to serious conflict on religious basis

Barbri Masjid, Gujrat Riots. Muslims in India get blamed for all sorts of stuff and the hindus retaliate. Being the majority would have made those issues worse not better

Approx

Bangladesh 150 mill
Pakistan 180
India 180
Kashmir 30

Total : 550-600 mill approx

Hindus alone 1 Billion,add sikhs and christians and others..........

So no your argument does not work in termsofnumbers
 
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Vitamin_C

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
With respect I do not think so. Combined Muslims would still be outnumbered

BUT that is not what it was about.It assumes us against them,inthat if we were in the majority, all the muslims wouldvote for muslims and hindus for hindus and democracy would prevail and we would rule

Would you really like to live somewhere where that was the case. It leads to serious conflict on religious basis

Barbri Masjid, Gujrat Riots. Muslims in India get blamed for all sorts of stuff and the hindus retaliate. Being the majority would have made those issues worse not better

People have lived there for hundreds of years there was no issue then. I dont hate the Hindu religion, nor do i believe any religion is bad, because religion reflects the cultures of civilizations and no culture is bad, they can be weird but you cant say they are bad. Generally where ever you go people love their children. I have no problem even if my neighbor drinks cow piss, ill smile back at him and say brother you can do as wish i have no problem. More Muslims are killed in acts of terrorism in Pakistan than in India. We cant be ignorant and say you are less than human for us which is why we want a separate land to stay, god made us all equal we should learn to co exist, there is no other planet to go to.
I just dont get it what we are going to do our problems are so serious Muslims are killing Muslims. I saw a video in Last ramadan, they were slaughtering a man, both the one who was being slaughtered was fasting and the one who was slaughtering was also fasting, and then someone yells him to hurry its almost iftari time.
My friends in UAE tell me forget it that you Pakistanis are Muslims, you are not even human.
 

UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
People have lived there for hundreds of years there was no issue then. I dont hate the Hindu religion, nor do i believe any religion is bad, because religion reflects the cultures of civilizations and no culture is bad, they can be weird but you cant say they are bad. Generally where ever you go people love their children. I have no problem even if my neighbor drinks cow piss, ill smile back at him and say brother you can do as wish i have no problem. More Muslims are killed in acts of terrorism in Pakistan than in India. We cant be ignorant and say you are less than human for us which is why we want a separate land to stay, god made us all equal we should learn to co exist, there is no other planet to go to.
I just dont get it what we are going to do our problems are so serious Muslims are killing Muslims. I saw a video in Last ramadan, they were slaughtering a man, both the one who was being slaughtered was fasting and the one who was slaughtering was also fasting, and then someone yells him to hurry its almost iftari time.
My friends in UAE tell me forget it that you Pakistanis are Muslims, you are not even human.

Why would you make friends with people who consider you subhuman ? Or Worse ?

What you say maybe true. I would merely ask you two things. How many muslims are being terrorised in Kashmir, how many dead and missing over how many years ?

Secondly I find it astonishing that you can say that for hundreds of years there were no problems. India was in a perpetual state of war with rebellions everywhere. That was the case before the Muslims and it remained so until the British established what they did.

1 Vedic period
2 The Magadha empire
2.1 Shishunaga dynasty
2.2 Nanda dynasty
2.3 Maurya Dynasty
3 Early Middle Kingdoms (the golden age)
3.1 Satavahana dynasty
3.2 Kushan empire
3.3 Gupta dynasty
4 Late Middle Kingdoms (the classical age)
4.1 Harsha's empire
4.2 The Chalukyas and Pallavas
4.3 The Chola empire
4.4 The Gurjar-Pratiharas, Palas and Rashtrakutas
5 The Medieval era
5.1 Delhi Sultanate
5.2 The Rajputs
5.3 Muzaffarid dynasty
5.4 Calicut
5.5 Vijayanagara Empire
5.6 Mughal Empire
5.7 Maratha Empire
5.8 Travancore
5.9 Mysore
5.10 The Sikh Empire
6 Company rule
7 The British Raj


Google those and see that there was little Peace involved in establishing those
 
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Vitamin_C

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
Why would you make friends with people who consider you subhuman ? Or Worse ?

What you say maybe true. I would merely ask you two things. How many muslims are being terrorised in Kashmir, how many dead and missing over how many years ?

Secondly I find it astonishing that you can say that for hundreds of years there were no problems. India was in a perpetual state of war with rebellions everywhere. That was the case before the Muslims and it remained so until the British established what they did.

1 Vedic period
2 The Magadha empire
2.1 Shishunaga dynasty
2.2 Nanda dynasty
2.3 Maurya Dynasty
3 Early Middle Kingdoms (the golden age)
3.1 Satavahana dynasty
3.2 Kushan empire
3.3 Gupta dynasty
4 Late Middle Kingdoms (the classical age)
4.1 Harsha's empire
4.2 The Chalukyas and Pallavas
4.3 The Chola empire
4.4 The Gurjar-Pratiharas, Palas and Rashtrakutas
5 The Medieval era
5.1 Delhi Sultanate
5.2 The Rajputs
5.3 Muzaffarid dynasty
5.4 Calicut
5.5 Vijayanagara Empire
5.6 Mughal Empire
5.7 Maratha Empire
5.8 Travancore
5.9 Mysore
5.10 The Sikh Empire
6 Company rule
7 The British Raj


Google those and see that there was little Peace involved in establishing those

This is the 21st century, we have nuclear weapons, but do we have peace now?
We must be wrong at some place. Were still making a mistake somehow.
Were not savages from the middle ages, but i can relate incidents to you which i dont want to, and you will say that God left this place a long time ago.
My friends in the Army tell me forget it just pray 5 times a day be a good human being and mind your own business, you dont even want to know whats happening around us.
 

UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
This is the 21st century, we have nuclear weapons, but do we have peace now?
We must be wrong at some place. Were still making a mistake somehow.
Were not savages from the middle ages, but i can relate incidents to you which i dont want to, and you will say that God left this place a long time ago.
My friends in the Army tell me forget it just pray 5 times a day be a good human being and mind your own business, you dont even want to know whats happening around us.

That I agree with, we (Pakistan) are in a sad state of affairs

However to relate that to Muslims would have been better off if Pakistan had not come to exist does not work for me The creation of Pakistan was absolutely right

We have been failed by the leaders imposed on us, not by THE Leader who carved Pakistan out of nothing
 
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UKPakistani

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
[h=1]The last of Jinnah’s knights[/h]




The last of Jinnah’s knights By Haris Masood Zuberi
Published: August 14, 2011

231394-QaimAzam-1313335866-454-640x480.JPG


Flt Lt Atta Rabbani breathes the air of freedom behind Quaid-e-Azam’s right shoulder on August 7, 1947.




KARACHI: With a glimmer in his eyes and a spirit of youthful enthusiasm, Atta Rabbani, who served as Jinnah’s Aide-de-Camp (ADC) 63 years ago, recounts his experience of working for his former boss.
Rabbani, who is pushing 90, is the last living passenger of the historic ‘flight of independence’ that brought Quaid-e-Azam and Fatima Jinnah from Delhi to Karachi – which was going to be the capital of independent Pakistan – on August 7 1947.
He vividly recounts details of the flight in the silver Douglas C-47 (DC-3) Dakota aircraft which took off from Palam airfield in Delhi, without even a hint of a public farewell. Rabbani recalls that as soon as the plane was airborne, Jinnah categorically exclaimed “That is the end of it!”
As the passengers enjoyed an aerial view of Delhi’s landmarks for the final time, Rabbani noticed that the Quaid remained silent and lost in deep thought throughout the journey. “One can only imagine the sense of overwhelming responsibility he must have felt at that very moment,” Rabbani reflects on Jinnah’s contemplative state.
Yet in stark contrast to its quiet takeoff, the aircraft landed amidst a deluge of fanatic supporters at Mauripur (now Masroor) airfield in Karachi.
The overjoyed well-wishers surrounded the aircraft, overwhelming all arrangements made for the reception. “We could not see any recognisable faces from the window except those of Liaquat Ali Khan and Abdur Rab Nishtar!”
The slogans of “Quaid-e-Azam Zindabad! Pakistan Zindabad!” echoed endlessly to herald Jinnah’s arrival in Pakistan. This particular scene is also captured in a popular historic photograph.
“I am proud to have been just a step behind our leader at that historic moment. I was in uniform and it was hard to control my emotions and push back tears of joy!” the former ADC recalls fondly.
As the ADCs stepped out behind Quaid-e-Azam and Fatima Jinnah, the fervent crowd lifted them.
The former pilot has a repertoire of many such fond memories about his time serving Pakistan’s founding father. He narrates jubilantly how he, as a 24-year-old young flight lieutenant in the Royal Indian Air Force, got lucky enough to serve Jinnah.
“I used to secretly imagine serving Quaid as the pilot of his aircraft, but that seemed far-fetched since I was still a soldier of the British Empire,” he says candidly.
Yet he admits that he unwittingly almost missed out on his dream opportunity. “I intentionally ignored three signals from my headquarters to report immediately as I was unaware of my appointment as Jinnah’s ADC. When I finally returned to Delhi, I was immediately intercepted at the railway station by a relative who was an army major,” he recalls with a laugh.
When he rushed to Quaid-e-Azam’s residence, the leader questioned him in a commanding manner, “What kept you Mr Rabbani?” But soon after hearing his explanation, he approved the young officer’s appointment.
Rabbani served as Jinnah’s ADC for over seven months following independence. Subsequently he was summoned to serve as flying instructor at the Royal Pakistan Air Force (RPAF) College in Risalpur. “I left Quaid’s house with a heavy heart. Even though he was reserved and formal, he was always very kind,” he recalls.
His last meeting with the governor general was in April 1948, when the latter visited RPAF College. During his visit, Jinnah patted Rabbani on the back and told him to visit Karachi. “His unprecedented gesture of affection made me feel an overwhelming sense of contentment,” he gushes.
“Till this day, I consider his pat on my shoulder as my knighthood; for me, it was the same as a monarch knighting a noble with a sword.”
Unfortunately the young pilot never got another chance to see Jinnah since he passed away soon afterwards. “When I visited Karachi a few months later, I paid my respects at his mausoleum,” says Rabbani ruefully.
The former flight lieutenant, who has witnessed the country’s drastic political transformation, candidly admits that the Pakistan dream has indeed gone sour. However, even at his age, he is certain that things will change for the better. “I am hopeful one day things will be on the right course — we have all necessary ingredients, the passion, hard-working people and military prowess. We can never we wiped out! All we need is the same spirit and unity as in 1947.”
Published in The Express Tribune, August 14[SUP]th[/SUP], 2011.
 

Vitamin_C

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
That I agree with, we (Pakistan) are in a sad state of affairs

However to relate that to Muslims would have been better off if Pakistan had not come to exist does not work for me The creation of Pakistan was absolutely right

We have been failed by the leaders imposed on us, not by THE Leader who carved Pakistan out of nothing

We do not have another option do we now, we have what we have we cant go back so no point questioning our existence.

Although if you look at the Sindhi culture it is still largely influenced by Hindu culture, and Hindu Sindhis by Islamic culture. Now we have 2 types of Hindus, one who burn their dead, others who bury their dead in a similar way as ours, there is a Hindu graveyard less than 500m from my house.
In our village Hindu women used to light diya in the mosque at night so that people could pray.
M.A Jinnah gave his life for the protection of the minorities, If he see how minorities are being oppressed today that wuld be a double face palm moment for him.
I dont care what we do to harm our country, it will carry on like this for centuries. But if Hindu girls are kidnapped forced into another religion and forcefully married by dirty hypocrite Mullahs and we cannot provide these people with justice then I can guarantee you this Pakistan will be wiped off the map, just because of this small mistake.
 
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