'Greatness and Destiny' - A man born to win | ESPN

desan

Prime Minister (20k+ posts)


That CB Fry should once have been offered the throne of Albania is seen as another eccentric feature of an already eccentric life. It has become a quiz question. That Imran Khan should have wanted to become prime minister of Pakistan is viewed as almost a natural ambition from a man whose thirst for achievement appears unslakeable. It has become a reality.

Other world-class cricketers have also sought to make a difference to life outside the game when they retire. All too often their plans founder as they struggle to cope with environments in which 6000 Test runs or 200 wickets do not seal contracts or persuade investors. After a few years they are content to return to the worlds they know and in which they lead fulfilling lives. They are reassured to see pictures from their pomp on the front of the cricket papers and in time they might have a pavilion named after them. Imran has had his face on the cover of Time magazine and has built a cancer hospital in memory of his mother.

The Pakistani establishment told him he couldn't build such a hospital and then they said he couldn't run an institution in which about 75% of cancer sufferers receive free treatment. He did both things. They took him nearly ten years. "I have never not believed I am going to win," he told Mike Atherton in 2016.

Some cricketers attend their county's annual reunions and are pleased to be recognised by members who reminisce about the best days of distant summers. Imran has done so much since he retired in 1992 - virtually none of it connected to cricket - that a few junior players, even in Pakistan, might take a moment or two to recall that their prime minister once captained the national team on the greatest day in its history. Then they will recall photographs of a floodlit Melbourne Cricket Ground on a late March evening in 1992 and their captain in his lime-green shirt holding aloft a Waterford crystal trophy and saying how this victory over England should help him achieve his other ambitions. Nobody but Imran knew it at the time but he had played his last match. He was 39 and the best cricketer his country had ever produced now turned his formidable attention to other things.

Imran's continuing desire to fulfil his ambitions outside the game was perhaps sharpened by his being born into his country's sporting aristocracy. Why achieve only the obviously achievable? Two of his cousins, Javed Burki and Majid Khan, were Oxbridge Blues and both captained Pakistan. (When Imran followed them as skipper of the national team, he dropped Majid from the side on the morning of his first Test in charge in 1982. There is as much steel as suavity in his character.) The family's affluence ensured that he attended Aitchison College, which is Pakistan's most famous school and was situated a short distance from the family home in the quiet Lahore suburb of Zaman Park. The high-quality coaching and excellent facilities at Aitchison helped to develop Imran's burgeoning talent and on the strength of 11 first-class games he was included in the party to tour England in 1971. He was 18 years old.

If his first trip to England proved to Imran that he was not yet ready for international cricket, it at least introduced him to the country where he would play the majority of his 382 first-class matches. He completed his secondary education at Worcester's Royal Grammar School and spent three years at Oxford, captaining the university in his second year and playing for Worcestershire when term had ended. Having once been an inswing bowler who could score a few runs, he was gradually becoming a proper all-rounder whose top-order batting could change games and whose fast bowling included a wicked bouncer. The leap in his delivery stride made you catch breath, especially, perhaps, if you were female.



Some Oxford contemporaries said Imran was aloof but all of them appreciated his strength of will once he was resolved on a course of action. That determination would be revealed in other ways. Having represented Worcestershire for one full season and been capped when his century and 13 wickets set up an innings victory against Lancashire, he moved to Sussex the following year in 1977 so that he could be nearer London, where his increasingly active social life was based. (For many years the gossip columnists would be as interested in his doings as cricket correspondents. Mercifully the two groups have rarely overlapped.)

He was banned for the 1978 Pakistan tour of England because he had joined Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket but he would later declare that his two Australian summers had been time well spent: Mike Procter had advised him on his run-up while John Snow had shown him how turning his left shoulder more towards fine leg would help his outswing.

Before long Snow's own county would be the beneficiary of those coaching clinics. Imran helped Sussex win two knockout trophies and had a leg-before appeal not been turned down in 1981 he might have been in the first Sussex side to win the County Championship. He did not want for self-confidence that summer, a trait noted by his skipper Johnny Barclay during the game against Derbyshire at Eastbourne where the visitors had five wickets in hand and a lead of over 230 on the final afternoon. A draw seemed in prospect. Imran decided he should bowl…

"Imran immediately trapped Steele lbw and, a man inspired, wiped out the rest of the batting. Four wickets in five balls, all bowled or lbw. Rarely have I seen such a devastating spell of bowling with an old ball.

Imran Khan is one of those very few people who has a sense of personal greatness and personal destiny... He is the nearest thing cricket has produced to a world-historical figure, Peter Oborne.
'That was clever bowling,' he said, as we left the field. 'Now I want to bat… I want to bat high in the order, I feel it is my day, we must beat this lot. I think I shall bat at four. The others won't mind.'"

Imran made 107 not out, reaching his century with 11 fours and three sixes in 88 minutes. By the end of the match, nobody gave a monkey's where he had batted, not least the large crowd on the last day of Eastbourne Week. Yet this determination to wrench a game of cricket into a shape of his own devising would be seen again on the game's far larger stages. Most notably, perhaps, it would be seen in Test series against the mighty West Indian and Australian sides of the 1980s, against whom Imran led Pakistan in six series, winning one, drawing three and losing only in Australia (where he had helped New South Wales win the Sheffield Shield in 1983-84.) Imran instilled a sense of common purpose into a Pakistani team whose capacity to tear itself apart had often seemed unbounded.

If anybody had doubted the new skipper's resolve they were quickly disabused of their misgivings when he declared with Javed Miandad on 280 in the fourth Test against India at Hyderabad in January 1983. The match was won by an innings deep in the fifth day, a result which sealed a series victory. Imran's approach to the various tasks of leadership was established. Then again it hardly harmed the cause that he had players of the quality of Miandad, Abdul Qadir and Wasim Akram in his side.

And if defeats in three successive World Cup semi-finals were lowlights in his international career, first series wins in both India and England in 1987 were quite the opposite. Imran took ten wickets at Headingley to secure Pakistan's only victory in the second of those five-match series and then made 118 at The Oval to ensure the overall victory was secure.



There were many other days of glory and each of his millions of fans in Pakistan had their favourite. Despite a stress fracture in his left leg which prevented him bowling for three years Imran finished his career with 362 Test wickets and 1287 in all first-class games. There were also 17,771 first-class runs and 117 catches. But sitting in the garden of his home in 2016 he had to be persuaded to talk about his cricket by Atherton. After all it was a long time ago and there are other things in life. More important things, though he did not say this.

"I always wanted to leave cricket once I had finished playing," he said, "I think the potential of a human being only grows when we challenge ourselves. Once life becomes easy it is all downhill. Once I was no longer challenged I always felt I would decay. I never wanted to take the easy road and stay in cricket… In life to succeed you have to have total passion and total commitment. Everything else takes second place... The day I left cricket it was over for me."

He has not been inured to the controversies of his country's cricketing past. He deeply regrets the match-fixing committed by other players and admits that he once changed the condition of a ball with a bottle-top. But those things, too, are in the past. Now there are hospitals to oversee and a country to run. When Pakistan's wealthy élite refused to help him construct a memorial to his mother, he went to the people and asked if they could help. His place in sporting history is for others to judge. No one is better placed to do so than Peter Oborne, who, with Richard Heller, has written one of the two fine histories of Pakistan's cricket.

"Imran Khan is one of those very few people who has a sense of personal greatness and personal destiny," Oborne said. "That destiny first of all manifested itself in an amazing cricket career when he forged a national team and made it the best in the world. And then it forged itself in this enormous monument to his mother: the great hospital which is still there. And then in a political career. [He] is the nearest thing cricket has produced to a world historical figure."

The gossip columnists have long been replaced by political journalists. Armed guards stand at the entrance to Imran's house and accompany him wherever he goes. His Tehreek-e-Insaf (Pakistan Movement for Justice) party is in power and is the subject of constant scrutiny. Its aim is to build a modern, egalitarian, democratic country, still Islamic, and with a welfare state. Most former cricketers are content to cast their vote every five years or so.

 
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Rajarawal111

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
That CB Fry should once have been offered the throne of Albania is seen as another eccentric feature of an already eccentric life. It has become a quiz question. That Imran Khan should have wanted to become prime minister of Pakistan is viewed as almost a natural ambition from a man whose thirst for achievement appears unslakeable. It has become a reality.

Other world-class cricketers have also sought to make a difference to life outside the game when they retire. All too often their plans founder as they struggle to cope with environments in which 6000 Test runs or 200 wickets do not seal contracts or persuade investors. After a few years they are content to return to the worlds they know and in which they lead fulfilling lives. They are reassured to see pictures from their pomp on the front of the cricket papers and in time they might have a pavilion named after them. Imran has had his face on the cover of Time magazine and has built a cancer hospital in memory of his mother.

The Pakistani establishment told him he couldn't build such a hospital and then they said he couldn't run an institution in which about 75% of cancer sufferers receive free treatment. He did both things. They took him nearly ten years. "I have never not believed I am going to win," he told Mike Atherton in 2016.

Some cricketers attend their county's annual reunions and are pleased to be recognised by members who reminisce about the best days of distant summers. Imran has done so much since he retired in 1992 - virtually none of it connected to cricket - that a few junior players, even in Pakistan, might take a moment or two to recall that their prime minister once captained the national team on the greatest day in its history. Then they will recall photographs of a floodlit Melbourne Cricket Ground on a late March evening in 1992 and their captain in his lime-green shirt holding aloft a Waterford crystal trophy and saying how this victory over England should help him achieve his other ambitions. Nobody but Imran knew it at the time but he had played his last match. He was 39 and the best cricketer his country had ever produced now turned his formidable attention to other things.

Imran's continuing desire to fulfil his ambitions outside the game was perhaps sharpened by his being born into his country's sporting aristocracy. Why achieve only the obviously achievable? Two of his cousins, Javed Burki and Majid Khan, were Oxbridge Blues and both captained Pakistan. (When Imran followed them as skipper of the national team, he dropped Majid from the side on the morning of his first Test in charge in 1982. There is as much steel as suavity in his character.) The family's affluence ensured that he attended Aitchison College, which is Pakistan's most famous school and was situated a short distance from the family home in the quiet Lahore suburb of Zaman Park. The high-quality coaching and excellent facilities at Aitchison helped to develop Imran's burgeoning talent and on the strength of 11 first-class games he was included in the party to tour England in 1971. He was 18 years old.

If his first trip to England proved to Imran that he was not yet ready for international cricket, it at least introduced him to the country where he would play the majority of his 382 first-class matches. He completed his secondary education at Worcester's Royal Grammar School and spent three years at Oxford, captaining the university in his second year and playing for Worcestershire when term had ended. Having once been an inswing bowler who could score a few runs, he was gradually becoming a proper all-rounder whose top-order batting could change games and whose fast bowling included a wicked bouncer. The leap in his delivery stride made you catch breath, especially, perhaps, if you were female.

Some Oxford contemporaries said Imran was aloof but all of them appreciated his strength of will once he was resolved on a course of action. That determination would be revealed in other ways. Having represented Worcestershire for one full season and been capped when his century and 13 wickets set up an innings victory against Lancashire, he moved to Sussex the following year in 1977 so that he could be nearer London, where his increasingly active social life was based. (For many years the gossip columnists would be as interested in his doings as cricket correspondents. Mercifully the two groups have rarely overlapped.)

He was banned for the 1978 Pakistan tour of England because he had joined Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket but he would later declare that his two Australian summers had been time well spent: Mike Procter had advised him on his run-up while John Snow had shown him how turning his left shoulder more towards fine leg would help his outswing.

Before long Snow's own county would be the beneficiary of those coaching clinics. Imran helped Sussex win two knockout trophies and had a leg-before appeal not been turned down in 1981 he might have been in the first Sussex side to win the County Championship. He did not want for self-confidence that summer, a trait noted by his skipper Johnny Barclay during the game against Derbyshire at Eastbourne where the visitors had five wickets in hand and a lead of over 230 on the final afternoon. A draw seemed in prospect. Imran decided he should bowl…

"Imran immediately trapped Steele lbw and, a man inspired, wiped out the rest of the batting. Four wickets in five balls, all bowled or lbw. Rarely have I seen such a devastating spell of bowling with an old ball.

Imran Khan is one of those very few people who has a sense of personal greatness and personal destiny... He is the nearest thing cricket has produced to a world historical figure, Peter Oborne.

'That was clever bowling,' he said, as we left the field. 'Now I want to bat… I want to bat high in the order, I feel it is my day, we must beat this lot. I think I shall bat at four. The others won't mind.'"

Imran made 107 not out, reaching his century with 11 fours and three sixes in 88 minutes. By the end of the match, nobody gave a monkey's where he had batted, not least the large crowd on the last day of Eastbourne Week. Yet this determination to wrench a game of cricket into a shape of his own devising would be seen again on the game's far larger stages. Most notably, perhaps, it would be seen in Test series against the mighty West Indian and Australian sides of the 1980s, against whom Imran led Pakistan in six series, winning one, drawing three and losing only in Australia (where he had helped New South Wales win the Sheffield Shield in 1983-84.) Imran instilled a sense of common purpose into a Pakistani team whose capacity to tear itself apart had often seemed unbounded.

If anybody had doubted the new skipper's resolve they were quickly disabused of their misgivings when he declared with Javed Miandad on 280 in the fourth Test against India at Hyderabad in January 1983. The match was won by an innings deep in the fifth day, a result which sealed a series victory. Imran's approach to the various tasks of leadership was established. Then again it hardly harmed the cause that he had players of the quality of Miandad, Abdul Qadir and Wasim Akram in his side.

And if defeats in three successive World Cup semi-finals were lowlights in his international career, first series wins in both India and England in 1987 were quite the opposite. Imran took ten wickets at Headingley to secure Pakistan's only victory in the second of those five-match series and then made 118 at The Oval to ensure the overall victory was secure.

There were many other days of glory and each of his millions of fans in Pakistan had their favourite. Despite a stress fracture in his left leg which prevented him bowling for three years Imran finished his career with 362 Test wickets and 1287 in all first-class games. There were also 17,771 first-class runs and 117 catches. But sitting in the garden of his home in 2016 he had to be persuaded to talk about his cricket by Atherton. After all it was a long time ago and there are other things in life. More important things, though he did not say this.

"I always wanted to leave cricket once I had finished playing," he said, "I think the potential of a human being only grows when we challenge ourselves. Once life becomes easy it is all downhill. Once I was no longer challenged I always felt I would decay. I never wanted to take the easy road and stay in cricket… In life to succeed you have to have total passion and total commitment. Everything else takes second place... The day I left cricket it was over for me."

He has not been inured to the controversies of his country's cricketing past. He deeply regrets the match-fixing committed by other players and admits that he once changed the condition of a ball with a bottle-top. But those things, too, are in the past. Now there are hospitals to oversee and a country to run. When Pakistan's wealthy élite refused to help him construct a memorial to his mother, he went to the people and asked if they could help. His place in sporting history is for others to judge. No one is better placed to do so than Peter Oborne, who, with Richard Heller, has written one of the two fine histories of Pakistan's cricket.

"Imran Khan is one of those very few people who has a sense of personal greatness and personal destiny," Oborne said. "That destiny first of all manifested itself in an amazing cricket career when he forged a national team and made it the best in the world. And then it forged itself in this enormous monument to his mother: the great hospital which is still there. And then in a political career. [He] is the nearest thing cricket has produced to a world historical figure."

The gossip columnists have long been replaced by political journalists. Armed guards stand at the entrance to Imran's house and accompany him wherever he goes. His Tehreek-e-Insaf (Pakistan Movement for Justice) party is in power and is the subject of constant scrutiny. Its aim is to build a modern, egalitarian, democratic country, still Islamic, and with a welfare state. Most former cricketers are content to cast their vote every five years or so.

لکھ لعنت اے چولاں اتے --- جو زمینی حقائق سے عوام کی توجہ ہٹانے کے لئے ہر کرتوت کرنے کے لئے تیار ہیں
 

بابا جی آف کینیڈا شریف

Politcal Worker (100+ posts)
I know its too much for your dumb patwari brain to understand but why do you think ESPN would publish this article to divert people's attention from so called 'zameeni haqaiq'
لکھ لعنت اے چولاں اتے --- جو زمینی حقائق سے عوام کی توجہ ہٹانے کے لئے ہر کرتوت کرنے کے لئے تیار ہیں

عمران خان پٹواریوں کے " شجرہ نصب " میں کافی آگے تک داخل چکا ھے . رونا پیٹنا تو بنتا ھے .
!! راجہ وڑل - روو ئیں زمینی حقائق نوں

 

Hussain1967

Minister (2k+ posts)
لکھ لعنت اے چولاں اتے --- جو زمینی حقائق سے عوام کی توجہ ہٹانے کے لئے ہر کرتوت کرنے کے لئے تیار ہیں
Every time his government is in trouble due to his bad performance and bad team selection, PTI media cell comes up with his cricketing prowess. Kia awaam nay IK ki cricketing abilities ka achaar daalna hai agar uss ki government awaam ko relief nahin day rahee? Few days ago, another moron posted Kapil Dev’s interview in favour of IK’s leadership in Cricket.
 

ahameed

Minister (2k+ posts)
لکھ لعنت اے چولاں اتے --- جو زمینی حقائق سے عوام کی توجہ ہٹانے کے لئے ہر کرتوت کرنے کے لئے تیار ہیں
راجہ جی گالیاں دینے سے یہ حقیقت تبدیل نہیں ہو گی کہ ن لیگ پانچ سالوں کے بعد پاکستان کی معیشت کی ریٹنگ منفی چھوڑ کر گئی تھی اور پاکستان کے ہر ادارے کو خسارے میں چھوڑ کر گئی تھی حتی کہ وہ ادارے بھی جن کو پیپلزپارٹی بھی منافع بخش چھوڑ کر گئی تھی حتی کہ اور ورلڈ بنک اور ایشین بنک نے کافی عرصہ پہلے قرضہ دینا بند کر دیا تھا
 

بابا جی آف کینیڈا شریف

Politcal Worker (100+ posts)
Every time his government is in trouble due to his bad performance and bad team selection, PTI media cell comes up with his cricketing prowess. Kia awaam nay IK ki cricketing abilities ka achaar daalna hai agar uss ki government awaam ko relief nahin day rahee? Few days ago, another moron posted Kapil Dev’s interview in favour of IK’s leadership in Cricket.

Nobody is asking you to accept the article and consider it a substitute for good governance and better living conditions for the ppl of Pakistan. You can keep criticising IK and the govt. for all-things-broken in Pakistan (cuz he's in charge at the moment).

But you can't take away the admiration and love Khan commands. You can't take away his accomplishments in cricket and philanthropy.

If your leaders aka Nawaz Sharif, Bilawal, Zardari, Altaf Hussain, Asfandyar Wali, Fazlur Rehman etc didn't achieve anything in life, other than what they made while in the rule, that's not the problem of this world.

If you have the guts, just write a similar article with achievements of your leaders. But sadly the effing idiots (including) BlowWell didn't do $hit in life. What to talk of achievements.

So dear haters! Please shove your jealousy up your tashreef and keep it there.
 

Rajarawal111

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
I know its too much for your dumb patwari brain to understand but why do you think ESPN would publish this article to divert people's attention from so called 'zameeni haqaiq'
.

So dear haters! Please shove your jealousy up your tashreef and keep it there.
او دفع کر اوے ائی یس پی این کو --- تو واپس لے جا اس کھوتے کو ائی یس پی این پر - جس جوگا یہ ہے

ایک ورلڈ کپ جو ہم نے قسمت سے جیت لیا - اب اس کو قوم کی جڑوں میں ڈالنا ہے تم لوگوں نے - انیو -- آسٹرلیا اور نیوزی لینڈ نے بھی ورلڈ کپ جیتے ہوے ہیں - ان کے کپتانوں نے بھی اپنی اپنی قوموں کو تن کے رکھا ہوا ہے کیا ؟؟؟

تم سارے بارلے تو ملکہ سے خیرات لے کر جی لو گے اس لئے تم لوگوں کی آنکھوں پر سور کی چربی چڑھی ہے - یہاں قوم کی جو حالت ہوئی ہے تم لوگوں کو کہاں نظر آے گی
 

Rajarawal111

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
راجہ جی گالیاں دینے سے یہ حقیقت تبدیل نہیں ہو گی کہ ن لیگ پانچ سالوں کے بعد پاکستان کی معیشت کی ریٹنگ منفی چھوڑ کر گئی تھی اور پاکستان کے ہر ادارے کو خسارے میں چھوڑ کر گئی تھی حتی کہ وہ ادارے بھی جن کو پیپلزپارٹی بھی منافع بخش چھوڑ کر گئی تھی حتی کہ اور ورلڈ بنک اور ایشین بنک نے کافی عرصہ پہلے قرضہ دینا بند کر دیا تھا
تمہارا چھوٹا سا دماغ ہے - اس لئے تمہیں سمجھ نہیں اے گی کہ کھوتا ساری امورٹس بند کر کے ایک دن میں کرنٹ اکونٹ ڈیفیسٹ پلس میں کر سکتا تھا - سال پورا کیوں لگایا اس نے ؟؟؟
اس شوبدہ بازی کا نتیجہ یہ نکلا کہ ملک کے لارج سکیل منیوفکچرنگ زمین بوس ہو گئی - ملک میں بے روزگاری بڑھ گی اور آج جی ڈی پی منفی میں ہے
پتا نہیں کیا دماغ ہے تمہارا جو یہ سمجھنے سے قاصر ہے



 

Munawarkhan

Minister (2k+ posts)
sahi keh rahay hi, experts ko kya pata, asal analysis time Ahsan Iqbal, Rana Sanaullah ka hota, hidden talent of Pakistan.

isiliyay 2018 main Pakistan bulandion ko choo raha tha

او دفع کر اوے ائی یس پی این کو --- تو واپس لے جا اس کھوتے کو ائی یس پی این پر - جس جوگا یہ ہے

ایک ورلڈ کپ جو ہم نے قسمت سے جیت لیا - اب اس کو قوم کی جڑوں میں ڈالنا ہے تم لوگوں نے - انیو -- آسٹرلیا اور نیوزی لینڈ نے بھی ورلڈ کپ جیتے ہوے ہیں - ان کے کپتانوں نے بھی اپنی اپنی قوموں کو تن کے رکھا ہوا ہے کیا ؟؟؟

تم سارے بارلے تو ملکہ سے خیرات لے کر جی لو گے اس لئے تم لوگوں کی آنکھوں پر سور کی چربی چڑھی ہے - یہاں قوم کی جو حالت ہوئی ہے تم لوگوں کو کہاں نظر آے گی
 

stoic

Minister (2k+ posts)
sahi keh rahay hi, experts ko kya pata, asal analysis time Ahsan Iqbal, Rana Sanaullah ka hota, hidden talent of Pakistan.

isiliyay 2018 main Pakistan bulandion ko choo raha tha
You are right, this dumb fk patwari is just out to embarrass himself further.

Here’s why Pakistan faces an economic crisis, no matter who wins today’s election

Published: July 25, 2018 at 3:42 a.m. ET

Voters in Pakistan headed to the polls on Wednesday, but no matter who wins, the South Asian nation looks to be headed for an economic and currency crisis.


“Whichever party wins Pakistan’s upcoming general election will take over an economy on the brink of a balance of payments crisis. Growth is likely to slow sharply regardless of who wins Wednesday’s election,” said Gareth Leather, senior Asia economist at Capital Economics.


Capital Economics forecasts GDP growth at 3% in the next two years, down from 5.8% in 2018.

Spiraling currencies, high inflation and issues surrounding external debt denominated in U.S. dollars has been a persistent issue for emerging and frontier markets over the past months as the U.S. dollar DXY, -0.23% picked up steam.



Oil prices, which have pushed higher since the start of the year, are also weighing on Pakistan’s trade and current account deficits. Brent crude for September delivery UK:LCOU8 last settled at $72.87. The global benchmark is up more than 9% in the year to date and more than 50% over the last 12 months.

Pakistan’s economy is at the brink of crisis for just those reasons. Since the start of 2016, imports of construction materials related to large-scale Chinese infrastructure investments led to the current-account deficit to soar, while its weakening currency along with economic growth pushed inflation higher. In June, core inflation stood at 7.1%, a four-year high. The next prime minister will have to keep tabs on the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor, which comprises these infrastructure projects, to ensure Pakistan won’t be left with so-called white elephants.


Of late, its central bank has been “forced to tighten monetary policy aggressively, sell off nearly half of its foreign exchange reserves, while also allowing the currency to weaken,” Leather said. With some FX reserves left, the country could even continue on this path for a bit longer. Pakistan could also secure a loan from its infrastructure investor China, Leather said.

The Pakistani rupee USDPKR, -0.07%, which isn’t officially pegged to the U.S. dollar but has been trading in a tight band, was little changed Tuesday, with one buck fetching 128.2700 rupees. Still, it remains close to an all-time low against the buck and has dropped 15.9% versus its U.S. rival so far in 2018, according to FactSet. The country last devalued its rupee on Wednesday last week to stave off capital outflows.

Many emerging markets, such as Turkey and Argentina, have raised their borrowing rates in the face of this issue. Pakistan belongs into that group too. With an estimates $75 billion of external debt, mostly in U.S. dollars, strength in the greenback is a real problem, because it makes Pakistan’s debt more expensive.

As far as Leather is concerned, Pakistan’s future premier has three choices.

“One option would be to completely abandon the [de facto] currency peg and let the rupee float. Given the large current-account deficit, the rupee would almost certainly fall sharply,” he wrote. That said, a big devaluation would make imports more expensive, which would push up inflation further, so option one might not be favorable.

The second option would be tightening monetary policy aggressively, adding to the 175 basis point tightening that already happened this year, to attract capital inflows. On the downside, this would further weigh on growth.

“The third option would be to request an emergency loan from the IMF,” Leather said. Pakistan has already been in 12 IMF programs and only emerged from the most recent one in September 2016. “While IMF support should help to stabilize the economy, they are likely to demand sharp cuts in government spending as well as further reforms to improve governance,” the economist said.

The front-runners for Wednesday’s election are Shehbaz Sharif, the brother for former Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, of the incumbent Pakistan Muslim League, and former cricketer Imran Khan, who is running for the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf party that he founded. In that respect, Khan fits the common denominator of populist political candidates that have cropped up across the global political scene. Bilawal Bhutto, son for former PM Benazir Bhutto, of the Pakistan People’s Party is seen running third.

 

Rajarawal111

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
sahi keh rahay hi, experts ko kya pata, asal analysis time Ahsan Iqbal, Rana Sanaullah ka hota, hidden talent of Pakistan.

isiliyay 2018 main Pakistan bulandion ko choo raha tha
تاریخ ضرور پڑھنا ذرا اس آرٹیکل کی - یہ ڈائریکٹ بلومبرگ کی ویب سائٹ پر ہے


منور خان میں نے تمہیں پہلے بھی کہا تھا کہ آنکھوں کے انے کو پھر بھی رستہ مل ہی جاتا ہے -- پر فطرت کے انے کو کھجل خواری ہی ملتی ہے - امید ہے کسی دن جناب کی فطرتی بینائی لوٹ آے گی --- ویسے اگر دوائی ڈالنی ہے فطرت والی آنکھوں میں تو بارلی نوکری چھوڑ کر گھر واپس جاؤ اور روز باہر نکلو روزگار کی تلاش میں - جلدی ہی کھل جایں گیں ساری آنکھیں
 

Munawarkhan

Minister (2k+ posts)
problem with you is you can never prove any of your analysis with fact or any data.

just politics rhetoric, Imran Khan corrupt hai Imran khan corrupt hai bas aisay hi chawalain opposition marti rahti hai.
تاریخ ضرور پڑھنا ذرا اس آرٹیکل کی - یہ ڈائریکٹ بلومبرگ کی ویب سائٹ پر ہے


منور خان میں نے تمہیں پہلے بھی کہا تھا کہ آنکھوں کے انے کو پھر بھی رستہ مل ہی جاتا ہے -- پر فطرت کے انے کو کھجل خواری ہی ملتی ہے - امید ہے کسی دن جناب کی فطرتی بینائی لوٹ آے گی --- ویسے اگر دوائی ڈالنی ہے فطرت والی آنکھوں میں تو بارلی نوکری چھوڑ کر گھر واپس جاؤ اور روز باہر نکلو روزگار کی تلاش میں - جلدی ہی کھل جایں گیں ساری آنکھیں
تاریخ ضرور پڑھنا ذرا اس آرٹیکل کی - یہ ڈائریکٹ بلومبرگ کی ویب سائٹ پر ہے


منور خان میں نے تمہیں پہلے بھی کہا تھا کہ آنکھوں کے انے کو پھر بھی رستہ مل ہی جاتا ہے -- پر فطرت کے انے کو کھجل خواری ہی ملتی ہے - امید ہے کسی دن جناب کی فطرتی بینائی لوٹ آے گی --- ویسے اگر دوائی ڈالنی ہے فطرت والی آنکھوں میں تو بارلی نوکری چھوڑ کر گھر واپس جاؤ اور روز باہر نکلو روزگار کی تلاش میں - جلدی ہی کھل جایں گیں ساری آنکھیں
 

Hasta la vista

Politcal Worker (100+ posts)
Pakistan.................a country of emotional fools always looking for a short cut to victory whether its the umpire ki ungli or crossing over the green belt in absence of a U-Turn...............and they always feel "accomplished" 😁
 

ahameed

Minister (2k+ posts)
تمہارا چھوٹا سا دماغ ہے - اس لئے تمہیں سمجھ نہیں اے گی کہ کھوتا ساری امورٹس بند کر کے ایک دن میں کرنٹ اکونٹ ڈیفیسٹ پلس میں کر سکتا تھا - سال پورا کیوں لگایا اس نے ؟؟؟
اس شوبدہ بازی کا نتیجہ یہ نکلا کہ ملک کے لارج سکیل منیوفکچرنگ زمین بوس ہو گئی - ملک میں بے روزگاری بڑھ گی اور آج جی ڈی پی منفی میں ہے
پتا نہیں کیا دماغ ہے تمہارا جو یہ سمجھنے سے قاصر ہے



آپ اپنے بڑے دماغ سے سوچ کر بتا دیں کہ

1۔۔۔۔۔۔۔۔۔۔
ن لیگ نےایکسپورٹس 25 ارب ڈالر سے پانچ سالون کے بعد 22 ارب ڈالر کر دیں تھیں اور 20 ارب ڈالر کا کرنٹ اکاؤنٹ خسارہ چھوڑا تھا جبکہ سٹیٹ بینک کے پاس صرف 20 دن کی امپورٹس کے پیسے تھے، اگر اسی سپیڈ سے امپورٹس کرتے تو کتنے دنوں بعد ہم ڈیفالٹ کر جاتے یا اتنا زیادہ فرق کس پیسے یا قرضے سے پورا کرتے؟؟؟

2۔۔۔۔۔۔۔۔
۔ کون سی امپورٹس پر ٹیکس زیادہ کیا گیا ھے کہ جس کی وجہ سے مینوفیکچرنگ زمین بوس ہوئی ھے؟؟؟
 

jani1

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
پٹواری چیخیں آسمانوں تک۔۔ 🤣 ۔۔
کپتان لے گیا بازی آسمانوں تک۔✍🤛👏💪۔۔
 

SaRashid

Minister (2k+ posts)
That CB Fry should once have been offered the throne of Albania is seen as another eccentric feature of an already eccentric life. It has become a quiz question. That Imran Khan should have wanted to become prime minister of Pakistan is viewed as almost a natural ambition from a man whose thirst for achievement appears unslakeable. It has become a reality.

Other world-class cricketers have also sought to make a difference to life outside the game when they retire. All too often their plans founder as they struggle to cope with environments in which 6000 Test runs or 200 wickets do not seal contracts or persuade investors. After a few years they are content to return to the worlds they know and in which they lead fulfilling lives. They are reassured to see pictures from their pomp on the front of the cricket papers and in time they might have a pavilion named after them. Imran has had his face on the cover of Time magazine and has built a cancer hospital in memory of his mother.

The Pakistani establishment told him he couldn't build such a hospital and then they said he couldn't run an institution in which about 75% of cancer sufferers receive free treatment. He did both things. They took him nearly ten years. "I have never not believed I am going to win," he told Mike Atherton in 2016.

Some cricketers attend their county's annual reunions and are pleased to be recognised by members who reminisce about the best days of distant summers. Imran has done so much since he retired in 1992 - virtually none of it connected to cricket - that a few junior players, even in Pakistan, might take a moment or two to recall that their prime minister once captained the national team on the greatest day in its history. Then they will recall photographs of a floodlit Melbourne Cricket Ground on a late March evening in 1992 and their captain in his lime-green shirt holding aloft a Waterford crystal trophy and saying how this victory over England should help him achieve his other ambitions. Nobody but Imran knew it at the time but he had played his last match. He was 39 and the best cricketer his country had ever produced now turned his formidable attention to other things.

Imran's continuing desire to fulfil his ambitions outside the game was perhaps sharpened by his being born into his country's sporting aristocracy. Why achieve only the obviously achievable? Two of his cousins, Javed Burki and Majid Khan, were Oxbridge Blues and both captained Pakistan. (When Imran followed them as skipper of the national team, he dropped Majid from the side on the morning of his first Test in charge in 1982. There is as much steel as suavity in his character.) The family's affluence ensured that he attended Aitchison College, which is Pakistan's most famous school and was situated a short distance from the family home in the quiet Lahore suburb of Zaman Park. The high-quality coaching and excellent facilities at Aitchison helped to develop Imran's burgeoning talent and on the strength of 11 first-class games he was included in the party to tour England in 1971. He was 18 years old.

If his first trip to England proved to Imran that he was not yet ready for international cricket, it at least introduced him to the country where he would play the majority of his 382 first-class matches. He completed his secondary education at Worcester's Royal Grammar School and spent three years at Oxford, captaining the university in his second year and playing for Worcestershire when term had ended. Having once been an inswing bowler who could score a few runs, he was gradually becoming a proper all-rounder whose top-order batting could change games and whose fast bowling included a wicked bouncer. The leap in his delivery stride made you catch breath, especially, perhaps, if you were female.

Some Oxford contemporaries said Imran was aloof but all of them appreciated his strength of will once he was resolved on a course of action. That determination would be revealed in other ways. Having represented Worcestershire for one full season and been capped when his century and 13 wickets set up an innings victory against Lancashire, he moved to Sussex the following year in 1977 so that he could be nearer London, where his increasingly active social life was based. (For many years the gossip columnists would be as interested in his doings as cricket correspondents. Mercifully the two groups have rarely overlapped.)

He was banned for the 1978 Pakistan tour of England because he had joined Kerry Packer's World Series Cricket but he would later declare that his two Australian summers had been time well spent: Mike Procter had advised him on his run-up while John Snow had shown him how turning his left shoulder more towards fine leg would help his outswing.

Before long Snow's own county would be the beneficiary of those coaching clinics. Imran helped Sussex win two knockout trophies and had a leg-before appeal not been turned down in 1981 he might have been in the first Sussex side to win the County Championship. He did not want for self-confidence that summer, a trait noted by his skipper Johnny Barclay during the game against Derbyshire at Eastbourne where the visitors had five wickets in hand and a lead of over 230 on the final afternoon. A draw seemed in prospect. Imran decided he should bowl…

"Imran immediately trapped Steele lbw and, a man inspired, wiped out the rest of the batting. Four wickets in five balls, all bowled or lbw. Rarely have I seen such a devastating spell of bowling with an old ball.

Imran Khan is one of those very few people who has a sense of personal greatness and personal destiny... He is the nearest thing cricket has produced to a world historical figure, Peter Oborne.

'That was clever bowling,' he said, as we left the field. 'Now I want to bat… I want to bat high in the order, I feel it is my day, we must beat this lot. I think I shall bat at four. The others won't mind.'"

Imran made 107 not out, reaching his century with 11 fours and three sixes in 88 minutes. By the end of the match, nobody gave a monkey's where he had batted, not least the large crowd on the last day of Eastbourne Week. Yet this determination to wrench a game of cricket into a shape of his own devising would be seen again on the game's far larger stages. Most notably, perhaps, it would be seen in Test series against the mighty West Indian and Australian sides of the 1980s, against whom Imran led Pakistan in six series, winning one, drawing three and losing only in Australia (where he had helped New South Wales win the Sheffield Shield in 1983-84.) Imran instilled a sense of common purpose into a Pakistani team whose capacity to tear itself apart had often seemed unbounded.

If anybody had doubted the new skipper's resolve they were quickly disabused of their misgivings when he declared with Javed Miandad on 280 in the fourth Test against India at Hyderabad in January 1983. The match was won by an innings deep in the fifth day, a result which sealed a series victory. Imran's approach to the various tasks of leadership was established. Then again it hardly harmed the cause that he had players of the quality of Miandad, Abdul Qadir and Wasim Akram in his side.

And if defeats in three successive World Cup semi-finals were lowlights in his international career, first series wins in both India and England in 1987 were quite the opposite. Imran took ten wickets at Headingley to secure Pakistan's only victory in the second of those five-match series and then made 118 at The Oval to ensure the overall victory was secure.

There were many other days of glory and each of his millions of fans in Pakistan had their favourite. Despite a stress fracture in his left leg which prevented him bowling for three years Imran finished his career with 362 Test wickets and 1287 in all first-class games. There were also 17,771 first-class runs and 117 catches. But sitting in the garden of his home in 2016 he had to be persuaded to talk about his cricket by Atherton. After all it was a long time ago and there are other things in life. More important things, though he did not say this.

"I always wanted to leave cricket once I had finished playing," he said, "I think the potential of a human being only grows when we challenge ourselves. Once life becomes easy it is all downhill. Once I was no longer challenged I always felt I would decay. I never wanted to take the easy road and stay in cricket… In life to succeed you have to have total passion and total commitment. Everything else takes second place... The day I left cricket it was over for me."

He has not been inured to the controversies of his country's cricketing past. He deeply regrets the match-fixing committed by other players and admits that he once changed the condition of a ball with a bottle-top. But those things, too, are in the past. Now there are hospitals to oversee and a country to run. When Pakistan's wealthy élite refused to help him construct a memorial to his mother, he went to the people and asked if they could help. His place in sporting history is for others to judge. No one is better placed to do so than Peter Oborne, who, with Richard Heller, has written one of the two fine histories of Pakistan's cricket.

"Imran Khan is one of those very few people who has a sense of personal greatness and personal destiny," Oborne said. "That destiny first of all manifested itself in an amazing cricket career when he forged a national team and made it the best in the world. And then it forged itself in this enormous monument to his mother: the great hospital which is still there. And then in a political career. [He] is the nearest thing cricket has produced to a world historical figure."

The gossip columnists have long been replaced by political journalists. Armed guards stand at the entrance to Imran's house and accompany him wherever he goes. His Tehreek-e-Insaf (Pakistan Movement for Justice) party is in power and is the subject of constant scrutiny. Its aim is to build a modern, egalitarian, democratic country, still Islamic, and with a welfare state. Most former cricketers are content to cast their vote every five years or so.



These ladies were also born to win 'the hearts'; so how about making them future 'puppet prime ministers'?
 

SaRashid

Minister (2k+ posts)
وینا ملک، ایان علی، حریم شاہ، نیلم منیر، اور مراد سعید بھی جیتنے کے لیے پیدا ہوئیں، تو ان کو بھی کسی جرنیل کی گود میں بٹھا دیں؟
 

desan

Prime Minister (20k+ posts)
وینا ملک، ایان علی، حریم شاہ، نیلم منیر، اور مراد سعید بھی جیتنے کے لیے پیدا ہوئیں، تو ان کو بھی کسی جرنیل کی گود میں بٹھا دیں؟


These ladies were also born to win 'the hearts'; so how about making them future 'puppet prime ministers'?
These random ramblings have become utterly amusing!!!

Keep up the good work of keeping us entertained...
 
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