Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) - Topic Overview

Night_Hawk

Siasat.pk - Blogger
[h=2]Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) - Topic Overview
[/h] Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a condition in which a person has trouble paying attention and focusing on tasks, tends to act without thinking, and has trouble sitting still. It may begin in early childhood and can continue into adulthood.

Without treatment, ADHD can cause problems at home, at school, at work, and with relationships. In the past, ADHD was called attention deficit disorder (ADD).


The exact cause is not clear, but ADHD tends to run in families.
The three types of ADHD symptoms include:



  • Trouble paying attention. People with ADHD are easily distracted. They have a hard time focusing on any one task.


  • Trouble sitting still for even a short time. This is called hyperactivity. Children with ADHD may squirm, fidget, or run around at the wrong times. Teens and adults often feel restless and fidgety. They aren't able to enjoy reading or other quiet activities.


  • Acting before thinking. People with ADHD may talk too loud, laugh too loud, or become angrier than the situation calls for. Children may not be able to wait for their turn or to share. This makes it hard for them to play with other children. Teens and adults may make quick decisions that have a long-term impact on their lives. They may spend too much money or change jobs often.

ADHD is often diagnosed when a child is between 6 and 12 years old. Teachers may notice symptoms in children who are in this age group.
First, the child will have tests to make sure that he or she doesn't have other problems such as learning disabilities, depression, or anxiety disorder.
The doctor will use guidelines from the American Psychiatric Association to diagnose ADHD. The doctor may also look at written reports about the child's behavior. Parents, teachers, and others who have regular contact with the child prepare these reports.



There is no cure for ADHD, but treatment may help control the symptoms. Treatment may include medicines and behavior therapy. Parents and other adults need to closely watch children after they begin to take medicines for ADHD. The medicines may cause side effects such as loss of appetite, headaches or stomachaches, tics or twitches, and problems sleeping. Side effects usually get better after a few weeks. If they don't, the doctor can lower the dose.


Therapy focuses on making changes in the environment to improve the child's behavior. Often, counseling and extra support at home and at school help children succeed at school and feel better about themselves.

Many adults don't realize that they have ADHD until their children are diagnosed. Then they begin to notice their own symptoms. Adults with ADHD may find it hard to focus, organize, and finish tasks. They often forget things. But they also often are very creative and curious. They love to ask questions and keep learning. Some adults with ADHD learn to manage their lives and find careers that let them use those strengths
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http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/tc/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd-topic-overview
 

Night_Hawk

Siasat.pk - Blogger
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[h=3]ADHD Affects Adults, Too[/h]Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder is not limited to children -- 30% to 70% of kids with ADHD continue having symptoms when they grow up. In addition, people who were never diagnosed as kids may develop more obvious symptoms in adulthood, causing trouble on the job or in relationships. Many adults don’t realize they have ADHD, leaving them mystified about why their goals seem to slip out of reach.

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[h=3]Signs of Adult ADHD: Running Late[/h]ADHD in adults follows a slightly different pattern than in children. Adults may be chronically late for work or important events. Adults may realize that their tardiness is undermining their goals, but they just can't seem to be on time.

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[h=3]Signs of Adult ADHD: Risky Driving[/h]One of the hallmarks of ADHD is difficulty keeping your mind on the task at hand. That spells trouble for teens and adults when they're behind the wheel of a vehicle. Studies show that people with ADHD are more likely to speed, have accidents, and lose their drivers' licenses.

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[h=3]Signs of Adult ADHD: Distraction[/h]Adults with ADHD may have trouble prioritizing, starting, and finishing tasks. They tend to be disorganized, restless, and easily distracted. Some people with ADHD have trouble concentrating while reading. The inability to stay focused and follow through on tasks can derail careers, ambitions, and relationships.

http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/ss/slideshow-adhd-in-adults
 

Kamboz

Senator (1k+ posts)
My 10 year old daughter had ADHD tests done last month. she is borderline....just to emphasize that this is a serious issue. My daughter is behind in her studies ... didnt pay attention in class. Also takes too much time to finish homework. There is medicine to cure this condition as well.
 

Night_Hawk

Siasat.pk - Blogger
[h=2]ADHD Diets
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ADHD is a brain disorder caused by faulty connections between nerve cells that regulate attention. There is no clear scientific evidence that it is caused by diet or nutritional problems. However, research suggests that certain food products may play at least some role in affecting ADHD symptoms in a subgroup of patients. So are there foods your child should eat or avoid? This article answers questions about ADHD diets, including elimination diets, supplements, and foods that may help improve ADHD symptoms.
Foods That Help You Concentrate

[h=3]What Is an ADHD diet?[/h]Ideally, an ADHD diet would help the brain work better and lessen symptoms of the disorder, such as restlessness or lack of focus. A diet may include the foods you eat and any nutritional supplements you may take. You may hear ADHD diets described in the following ways:
Overall nutrition for ADHD: This includes the food you eat daily. How can your overall nutrition help or hurt ADHD? The assumption is that some foods you eat may make ADHD symptoms better or worse. You may also be lacking some foods that could help make symptoms better.
Supplementation diets for ADHD: This includes adding vitamins, minerals, or other nutrients to make up for deficiencies in your diet that may contribute to ADHD symptoms. The assumption is that nutritional component that your body needs is lacking from your diet.
Elimination diets for ADHD: This involves removing foods or ingredients that are suspected of contributing to ADHD symptoms. The assumption is that you are eating something unhealthy that triggers certain behaviors or makes them worse.
[h=3]Overall Nutrition and ADHD[/h]Scientific research on ADHD diets is limited and results are mixed. Many health experts, however, do believe that diet may play a role in relieving ADHD symptoms. ADHD expert Richard Sogn, MD, points out that whatever is good for the brain is likely to be good for ADHD.

  • Eat a high-protein diet, including beans, cheese, eggs, meat, and nuts. Add protein foods in the morning and for after-school snacks, to improve concentration and possibly increase the time ADHD medications work.
  • Eat fewer simple carbohydrates, such as candy, corn syrup, honey, sugar, products made from white flour, white rice, and potatoes without the skins.
  • Eat more complex carbohydrates, such as vegetables and some fruits (including oranges, tangerines, pears, grapefruit, apples, and kiwi). Eating complex carbs at night may aid sleep.
  • Eat more omega-3 fatty acids, such as those found in tuna, salmon, other cold-water white fish, walnuts, Brazil nuts, and olive and canola oil. Omega-3 fatty acids are also available in supplement form.
http://www.webmd.com/add-adhd/guide/adhd-diets
 

Vitamin_C

Chief Minister (5k+ posts)
It mostly happens to American or Canadian kids.
Their ancestors travelled to an unknown land which had no riches like the gold in South America. North America was very poor and they only had trees to cut or land to work on, those people who migrated early to North America were poor people of Europe and had even more stressful life when they migrated. There were many generations of this stressful life and it made ADHD more inherit in genetics of kids in North America.
 
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