All Rise for the People of Egypt!

Mojo-jojo

Minister (2k+ posts)
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Jun 26, 2012

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All rise for the people of Egypt
By Sami Moubayed

The last thing Arab seculars wanted was an Islamist being elected as president of Egypt. Having said that, Mohammad Morsi's victory is a glorious day in Arab history - a benchmark for Arab democracy - that ought to be appreciated and respected, regardless of what one thinks of the Muslim Brotherhood that brought him to power.

After almost 80 years spent in the underground, the Egyptian Brotherhood finally has been given rightful turn at the Egyptian presidency. They achieved this through the ballot box, rather than via a military coup, the route for all the officers who had ruled Egypt since 1952.

Morsi is a civilian democratically elected president, whereas all his predecessors were officers. Seculars are furious, however, arguing that the Brotherhood is as autocratic as deposed



president Hosni Mubarak because their charter will be the Holy Koran, rather than the Egyptian constitution that is yet to be authored.

This is nonsense to those who have faith in Egyptian institutions and the judiciary. Some, however, are arguing that this day marks the start of the Brotherhood's long march into history, as it will walk a path taken before it by revolutionary parties that performed exceptionally well when serving in the Arab underground, but faltered the minute they came to power.

The case of the Iraqi and Syrian Ba'ath parties are prime examples, and so are Fatah and Hamas in Palestine. Catchy slogans from the streets of Cairo and pointing to stories of agony in Mubarak's jails are one thing, but running a state is completely different.

Having battled the autocracy of King Farouk, Gamal Abdul Nasser, Anwar al-Sadat, and Mubarak, the Brotherhood's new battle will be protecting its members from the temptations of corruption, greed, nepotism, and embezzlement that come with the reins of power in the Arab World.

What makes it more difficult is the Arab Spring, though this paved the way for Morsi's rise to the Presidential Palace. The Egyptian youth are on high alert and ready - when the need may come - to take to the streets again, and again, and again, should Morsi transform into another Mubarak. They did it once in February 2011, and can do it again should Morsi fail to deliver. In the hands of Egyptian youth, Egypt's future remains safe.

Full Article:
http://atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/NF26Ak03.html
 

Mojo-jojo

Minister (2k+ posts)
Perhaps they will be better than Mubarak and definitely much better than Zardari and Raja Rental & Co., Inc.
 

umairel

Councller (250+ posts)
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مصری عوام اخوان المسلیمین کی جیت پر سجدہ شکر ادا کرتے ہوئے ۔
 

Mojo-jojo

Minister (2k+ posts)


Jahan Baani Se Hai Dushwar Tar Kar-E-Jahan Beeni
Jigar Khoon Ho To Chashm-E-Dil Mein Hoti Hai Nazar Paida

More difficult than the conquest of the world is the task of seeing the world;
When the heart is reduced to blood, only then does the eye of the heart receive its sight.


Yehi Maqsood-E-Fitrat Hai, Yehi Ramz-E-Muslamani
Akhuwat Ki Jahangeeri, Mohabat Ki Farawani

This is the destiny of nature; this is the secret of Islam—
World‐wide brotherhood, an abundance of love!​
 
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